Feminism | Posted by Julie Graves on 03/10/2017

An Interview With Award-Winning Teen Activist Filmmaker Jordan Barger

Jordan Barger

Jordan Barger

Jordan Barger is a junior in high school from Houston, Texas. She also happens to be an award-winning filmmaker who has her own production company, JOM Productions. Barger’s short film, “Milky White // Rosy Petals,” has been shown at three film festivals around the U.S.; she won Best Student Film at the Austin Revolution Film Festival; and she was nominated for the Best Youth Filmmaker at the Long Beach Indie International Film Festival.

In light of recent political controversies surrounding President Donald Trump, Barger has begun to approach filmmaking from a perspective of political activism. I asked her about how film can be an activist tool, and how she sees political activism evolving among our generation.

This interview has been condensed and edited for clarity.

Julie Graves: How

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Feminism | Posted by Angela Liu on 03/9/2017

The Fight Against the Single Story: ‘Speed Sisters’ Amber Fares and Rabab Haj Yahya on Sisterhood, Resilience, and the Importance of Human Connection

Speed Sisters

Speed Sisters

Being the first takes courage. Putting yourself in a position of vulnerability, stepping out of your comfort zone, and risking failure can be terrifying—but also hugely rewarding. It’s an experience five women in Palestine who formed the Middle East’s first completely female race-car-driving team know well—and one at the center of the documentary Speed Sisters, which tracks the team’s journey over the course of two racing seasons, as they strive to better themselves, each other, and their communities.

When I watched Speed Sisters, I was amazed at how easily I connected with each of the characters even though they live half a world away from me. The film’s unique authenticity and warmth is in huge part thanks to the collaboration of two women: director and producer Amber …

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Feminism | Posted by Laura Espinoza on 03/8/2017

A Guide To Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)

ICE

During his campaign, President Donald Trump made it clear he would build a wall on the country’s southern border, introduce the End Illegal Immigration Act, and terminate prior executive orders that help undocumented immigrants, such as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. Recently, it seems that he is following through on these promises. Undocumented immigrants have found themselves increasingly at risk in places where they were safe under the Obama administration and have faced an overall increase in arrests.

What’s more, some of these arrests have blatantly endangered the individuals targeted. For example, the El Paso Times reported on Feb. 15 that a domestic violence victim was arrested in court while trying to obtain a protective order against her abuser. The tip may have come from her abuser …

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Feminism | Posted by Ashley Johnson on 03/7/2017

Embracing My Blackness At Predominantly White Institutions

My schools have all been predominately white

I wouldn’t say that I necessarily felt white growing up, but I never felt all that black, either. I wasn’t raised to feel in any way less than my white counterparts, but at the same time, my parents never taught or encouraged me to identify strongly with being black. We never had a history lesson on blackness in my home or any in-depth conversations about Dr. King on his birthday. We weren’t part of a black community: we didn’t go to church regularly and were mostly isolated from our extended family—we never had the Tyler Perry-esque big, jolly reunions I saw black families have on TV and in the movies. Rather, my siblings and I were raised to believe that we were, in …

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Feminism | Posted by Mankaprr Conteh on 03/1/2017

Hands on Their Backs: How Black Girls Are Pushed Out of Schools

Dr. Monique Morris on black girl “pushout”

Dr. Monique Morris made me nervous. She shouldn’t have. She has soft-looking chestnut skin and gorgeous locs. On the day we met, she wore a set of bracelets whimsically stacked on her arm that chimed when she entered the radio station. Later that day, I would watch her sing, smile, and reference west-coast hip-hop as she gave a presentation on school discipline, black girls, and the juvenile justice system — her areas of expertise.

Dr. Morris is beautiful and charming and kind. She’s an advocate and scholar who goes as hard for black girls as I should have when I had the chance. So, when she sits in front of me, ready for me to interview her, I don’t just see her. I …

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Feminism | Posted by Kadin Burnett on 02/28/2017

#DearBetsy: Protect Title IX

Betsy DeVos

Betsy DeVos’s appointment as the United States Secretary of Education is monumentally problematic. DeVos has no background in education: in fact, her appointment will be her first job held in the field of education. DeVos did not attend public school, yet will have the authority to  make decisions that affect 100,000 public schools and 90% of school-aged children in the country. Even her alma mater, Calvin College, went to lengths to pen an open letter explaining why DeVos was unfit for her position.

Betsy DeVos doesn’t strike fear into the hearts of education advocates and sexual assault activists because she has committed to radical measures of reform, however. Rather, she is feared because she has been totally incapable of putting forward anything more substantive than an irritatingly murky

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Feminism | Posted by Gabby Catalano on 02/27/2017

This Eating Disorder Survivor Is Making A Difference

Dayna Altman

Dayna Altman

“There’s beauty in everything and everyone, and that shouldn’t be decided by the media or anyone,” Dayna Altman — a 24-year-old eating disorder survivor, graduate student, and mental health activist from the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) — told me in a recent interview.

Dayna, who agreed to share her story with the FBomb for National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, is from Massachusetts, and grew up dancing. As early as elementary school, she told me, she started experiencing and depression, anxiety, OCD and eating disorder habits. She wasn’t diagnosed with anxiety and major depression until her first year at Providence College, however. At that point, she received several months of clinical treatment, which in turn informs her work as an activist today.

Looking back, Dayna believes her …

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Feminism | Posted by Libby Segal on 02/22/2017

A Mother-Daughter Outing

Credit: Libby Segal

Credit: Libby Segal

I came out to my family at 25 years old. It was 2014, and while the country had made great progress in acceptance in terms of recognizing civil unions, putting more LGBTQ figures on television, and passing pro-gay laws, coming out was still a weighty experience. I was fortunate enough to have recently moved to New York, where there was less stigma and more acceptance for LGBTQ folks than there was on my college campus in Rhode Island or in my hometown of Bethlehem, PA. But even so, I struggled with the coming out process, mostly because I had struggled so hard to come out to myself.

I had never really been worried about what my parents would say or think when I eventually came out, but

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