A Little F'd Up: Why Feminism Is Not A Dirty Word by Julie Zeilinger now available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble

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Feminism | Posted by Martha H on 07/22/2015

The Case for Criminalizing Street Harassment

Stop street harassment.

This is my thought process before leaving the house: I want to look nice and appreciate fashion, but also know that if I’m going to be on public transport or walking down the street, I must actively check my outfit to be sure it won’t subject me to catcalling.

As a politically-minded, strong person, I would ideally like to make my own choices about everything in my life, including what I wear. I would love to be able to rise above threatening perpetrators of harassment. But in reality, I do regulate my outfit to conform to society’s pressure and avoid the consequences of other’s behavior. I moderate my choices because I’m scared that I will not only get verbally harassed, but that this harassment could lead to …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Saskia G on 07/21/2015

What Misty Copeland’s Success Reveals About Race In The Arts

Misty Copeland in an Under Armour commercial

Misty Copeland in an Under Armour commercial

Misty Copeland made history on June 30th when she was promoted within the  American Ballet Theatre, becoming the first African American ballerina to reach the rank of Principal Dancer after being the second-ever black soloist in the traditionally white ballet company. Considering that almost all principal ballerinas around the world have historically been white, Copeland’s promotion is an immense achievement in an artistic tradition that still largely favors pale skin and extremely thin bodies.

Copeland rose to fame amid circumstances that, for elite ballet, seem at odds with her success. She took her first ballet class at her local Boys & Girls Club at 13-years-old — a relatively late start — and lived with her single mother and siblings in relative poverty …

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Feminism | Posted by Sabrina N on 07/20/2015

The Problem With Rainbow-Tinted Facebook Profile Pictures

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The rainbow-tinted filter.

In the wake of the historic Supreme Court decision to universally legalize same-sex marriage, 26 million Facebook users demonstrated their support by superimposing a rainbow-tinted flag over their profile pictures.

On the one hand, this seemed like an inspiring indication of progress: It quickly, easily, and publicly allowed people to show their support for the SCOTUS decision as well as LGBTQ+ rights more broadly. It functioned both as a symbol of celebration and declaration of one’s stance on an important social issue. A profile picture isn’t a vote, a petition, or even an impassioned status, but it is a way for people who might not otherwise do anything to subtly state their opinion. Changing one’s picture could also inspire others to start a conversation, change their own …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Kinder L on 07/16/2015

How One Anti-Body Shaming Campaign Actually Reinforced Beauty Standards

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#DontJudgeMe Challenge

I have a mole on my right cheek. As a child, it was the physical feature about which I felt the most insecure. For years, however, my mother insisted that what I considered a flaw was actually a “beauty mark.” Thanks to her persistence, I eventually realized that my mole is not something to be ashamed of, but part of who I am. I slowly learned to love this beauty mark and ultimately discarded my life goal of getting it removed as an adult.

I recalled this experience when I learned about a recent social media trend called the #DontJudgeMe challenge. This challenge simply required that individuals post pictures of themselves appearing as ugly as possible — by drawing flaws onto their images or purposely applying grotesque makeup. …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 07/15/2015

HelloFlo, Hello Naama: An Interview With HelloFlo Founder, Naama Bloom

The Period Fairy

The Period Fairy

You may be familiar with HelloFlo from their viral videos that buck period-related stigmas and feature boisterous young girls celebrating their time of month. But this company is much more than these adorable videos: They’re revolutionizing periods with monthly period subscriptions, period kits for various life stages, and engaging, straightforward content that educates and empowers.

FBomb editorial board members Sabrina Nelson, Lexi Van Ligten, and David Guirgis recently sat down with the company’s founder, Naama Bloom, to discuss periods, entrepreneurship, and the vital importance of educating women about their own bodies.

What inspired you to start HelloFlo?

I just really wanted someone to show up at my door with tampons a couple days before my period, so I thought, ‘Oh, I wonder if I can just make …

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Feminism | Posted by Eliza V on 07/14/2015

The Importance of Embracing Change

Sydney, Australia

When I was sixteen my parents and I packed up and moved from Australia to New York. I left behind my school, the place I grew up, some friends, and many family members. It was a big change, but one that I welcomed.

At the time I felt like I had hit a dead end at school and needed change. My grades were average at best and I didn’t feel passionate about anything. I didn’t have many friends and felt like I had seen all that life had to offer, even though I was only sixteen. I somehow knew that this couldn’t be true, that there had to be something more. My dad’s decision to take a job in New York, and the corresponding possibility of finding something …

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Feminism | Posted by Ines R on 07/13/2015

Why What We Wear To Work Actually Matters

How much time do you spend getting ready for work?

I remember watching my mother get ready for work in the mornings as a little girl. Every day she went through the careful, time-consuming process of doing her makeup and selecting a button down shirt to wear beneath a suit (complete with a shoulder-padded blazer, of course). Even when I moved to Washington D.C. for college just two summers ago, women wearing these complicated outfits abounded on Capitol Hill — even in the humid summer weather.

It’s no surprise, then, that these images informed my understanding of “work appropriate” clothing as I dressed for an intern orientation a few weeks ago. And I clearly wasn’t the only one: So many of my fellow female interns wore similar attire, including a …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Natalie H on 07/9/2015

‘Miss USA’ Switched Networks, But Should It Be Retired Altogether?

Miss America 2014.

NBC recently dropped the Miss USA Pageant, but the pageant quickly found a new home with cable network REELZ. However, it seems like this could have been a good time to stop televising the pageant altogether — and probably should have been.

Although the pageant often highlights the fact that it provides scholarships to its contestants and is thus an academic opportunity, this argument is undeniably incompatible with the contest’s emphasis on beauty. If the pageant is truly a contest of academic achievement, appearance should not factor into whether or not participants receive a scholarship or have any chance to enter the so-called ‘academic’ competition in the first place. How does the way one’s body looks in a bikini relate to their academic capability?

What’s more, the …

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