A Little F'd Up: Why Feminism Is Not A Dirty Word by Julie Zeilinger now available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble

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Feminism | Posted by Sabrina N on 05/12/2014

On Overcoming Body Hatred

The first time I felt bad about my body was at my best friend’s swimming pool birthday party, when I was just 11 years old. My friend, who has a very different body shape than I do, was much smaller than me at the time and I felt too conspicuous. It made the party I had been so looking forward to into a miserable experience. I felt like I was taking up too much space– a hard thing to conceptualize at any age, let alone 11.

As I got older, my dislike towards my body became less vague and more intense. I started hating my calves; I began to loathe my thighs. I constantly compared myself to others, and I thought about my weight way more than anyone should. It …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Max K on 05/9/2014

Explaining the “Fake Geek Girl”

A few days ago, a friend of mine came to me with an all too common complaint. She was trying to get into a predominantly male fandom and was being met with accusations of being a “Fake Geek Girl”. For the unfamiliar, a “Fake Geek Girl” is a girl who takes interest in nerdy things like video games and comic books for the attention, but doesn’t actually know anything about said interest. The problem is that this accusation seems to have no grounding in reality and has drawn the ire of many female gamers.

This raises an important question: if the Fake Geek Girl doesn’t exist, why is the accusation so common? To understand this trend, we must venture back in time all the way to the mid-eighties. This is …

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Feminism | Posted by Katie Koestner on 05/7/2014

An Open Letter to TBTN Event Holders

I was 18 years old when I joined you.  Many of you had been holding Take Back the Night events in rain or snow, amid hecklers, for years. Some of you were already making your way to radical, already past liberal.  Some of you were done with patriarchy.  Separatists.  Some of you had carried broomsticks with tampons affixed on top.  You had dyed your dormroom bedsheets black so that you could march as witches through campus. I didn’t know how much I would adore your gumption.

Some of you were not yet born.  Maybe you found TBTN when a night/day kicked you in the gut-heart-head.  You heard about us and showed up to see what this TBTN thing was, to see if you fit in.

It was the spring of …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Annemarie McDaniel on 05/5/2014

America Voted for Laverne Cox, So Why Didn’t TIME Magazine Listen?

When I was in 12th grade, I asked my parents to buy me a subscription to TIME Magazine so I could learn more about current events before heading off to college. I still remember when the TIME 100 Most Influential came in the mail, and the glossy collage of famous faces on its cover.  I read every single bio inside, thinking to myself how I wanted to know the stories of such important and inspiring people. Two years later, TIME 100 has tried more and more to capture the attention of young audiences through social media. TIME’s online poll allowed users to vote for their favorites and then share their votes on Facebook or Twitter. Friends of mine who weren’t regular TIME readers were still tweeting and posting about …

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Feminism | Posted by Lauren M on 04/30/2014

Changing the Dialogue About Women’s Sports

It has been a pretty good month to be from Connecticut. March Madness came to a close on Monday, April 7th and Tuesday, April 8th, with the championship victories of the Men and Women’s National Basketball Tournament. The UCONN Huskies Men and Women’s basketball teams both won, making it the second time in the history of the NCAA Tournament where both championships were won by the same school. Who did it the first time? The Huskies, back in 2004. Having the men win the tournament seemed like a long shot; they were the 7th seed and they had to face some pretty good teams along the way. The women on the other hand were favorited, as they had been undefeated in the regular season. This sounds like great news right? …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Celeste Y on 04/28/2014

Lady Promposals: I’m Breaking the Prom Double Standard — Right Now

With my grade’s school day countdown approaching the twenties, obligatory end-of-high-school events are becoming very real, very quickly. Prom season feels like it has been coming for a lifetime and for some girls, it actually has. For those girls, it’s an exciting time. Dresses! Hair! Lipstick! Other things I’ve never been concerned with! In my opinion, however, the whole event has cast a dusky, dis-empowering and somewhat misogynist cloud over the final chapters of senior year.

For those of you who are unaware (adults) of modern day prom etiquette — it’s extravagant. A promposal is a self-explanatory invitation to prom. But they are usually and increasingly grand, romantic and often public gestures wherein boys ask girls to be their dates. They typically involve the spelling of “P-R-O-M?” in creative ways, …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Darializa Avila-Chevalier on 04/24/2014

Choosing Not to Support Marginalization of Minority Groups Through Illustration

As an artist for my college’s newspaper, the Columbia Spectator, I sometimes have to illustrate pieces laced with unrecognized privilege. I’ve drawn for articles that fetishize poverty in Spanish Harlem and pieces that depict the “Columbia experience” as entirely universal to its student body. I’ve also illustrated for authors who have complained that “their privilege excludes them from conversation.” As a result, I, a low-income, Afro-Latina, first-generation American woman, feel alienated in my own community. This is not to say that Spec’s contributors aim to drown out the voices of the marginalized—I believe most have good intentions and hope to create a forum of expression safe for all identities. But intention is irrelevant when people of marginalized identities feel the ever-present divide reinforced.

I love illustrating for Spectator, …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 04/22/2014

Exciting News: The FBomb Is Joining the Women’s Media Center

Discovering the world of feminist blogging was an experience of simultaneous relief and isolation: just as Second Wave feminists have described the way consciousness raising allowed them to realize that their frustration with and opposition to sexism wasn’t individual insanity but a collective imperative, feminist blogging allowed me – and certainly countless others – to find comfort in the collective of like-minded people thinking critically about and combating inequality. But at the same time that I found such reprieve online, my lived reality was mired in ideologies that existed in ambivalence and direct contradiction to those ideals.

It was this paradox that led me to start the FBomb. I wanted to bridge the gap between my peers who hadn’t been exposed to feminism and those searching for like-minded people who …

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