Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 02/8/2017

Bridging The Divide

UC Berkeley

I dressed up as Donald Trump for Halloween in 2015. My costume was inspired by my disbelief that a “sexy Donald Trump” costume was being sold on the Internet. Instead of supporting the company that had (seemingly earnestly) created that costume, I decided to parody the idea by making my own. I borrowed my friend’s suit jacket and tie, bought a blond wig, and wrote “Make America Great Again” in black sharpie on a generic red baseball cap.  My friend dressed up as Melania Trump: She wore a tight dress, high heels, fake eyelashes, and curled her hair.  I posted a photo taken of our costumes on Instagram, complete with what I saw as a fitting Trump quote: “You know, it doesn’t really matter what [the media] writes

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Feminism | Posted by Reilly W on 02/6/2017

How Young People Can Best Fight For Reproductive Justice

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Visit http://allaboveall.org/ for more info.

Post-Women’s March, I’ve noticed that many of my friends feel like they’re fumbling around for activist motivation. They’re trying to find a way to keep the momentum going, but are failing to find ways to feel like they’re helping to push for change. I felt the same way, and chose to respond by making it my goal to reach out to at least one elected official each day. It has felt like a tangible way to resist broader political actions that I essentially have no say in or control over.

One of the major issues I have contacted my representatives about is abortion care, since reproductive rights are currently under attack. In fact, HR7 — one of the most destructive pieces of abortion legislation that …

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Feminism | Posted by Mankaprr Conteh on 01/23/2017

What I Witnessed At The Women’s March

Lakeisha Robinson at the March

Lakeisha Robinson at the March

Janelle Monáe took the Women’s March on Washington stage with a box office hit under her belt, hope for unity among the hundreds of thousands of women before her in her heart, and what should have been a simple request of those women on her lips.

As she performed her anthemic protest song “Hell You Talmbout,” Monáe would call the name of Sandra Bland, a young black activist who suspiciously, supposedly took her own life while in police custody.

“Say her name,” were the words Monáe charged the audience to respond with, invoking the African American Policy Forum’s 2015 campaign that recognized police violence against black women.

“Sandra Bland!” she yelled.

“No!” pockets of white women around me yelled in response.

We …

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Feminism | Posted by Virginia Jiang on 01/20/2017

Why I March

Are you going to March?

Are you going to March?

I remember the first time I was called a fag.

It was on a crisp fall day. I was walking to class. A man passed by me. It was casual, almost off-hand, like a bigoted stutter. It wasn’t the first time I had heard the word, but it was the first time it felt pointed, chiseled into the heart of my being. It was two days after the 2016 election.

Before that day, I had never felt that sense of otherness – the feeling that I was somehow alien to my homeland. Because though I am a queer woman of color, I had never before felt that my identities could fuel such casual enmity.

Maybe that was naïve of me, but we do live in …

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Awareness, Feminism | Posted by Marina Preciado on 01/19/2017

Why I Organized A Walkout At My High School

Our walkout.

Our walkout.

Donald Trump announced the launch of his presidential campaign two years ago. At the time, many Americans laughed at the idea that a reality TV star and multi-billionaire businessman with no political experience was running for the highest position of political leadership in the country.

On January 20, 2017, no one will be laughing. We will swallow the large pill of Donald Trump’s presidency as he is sworn into office. We will watch him place his hand on the Bible and promise to honor a Constitution it’s doubtful that he has even read let alone one which plans to interpret with fair and honorable intentions.

The night of the election, my family sat in front of the television trying to hide our shared nervousness from each other. Our …

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Feminism | Posted by Micaela Elizabeth Canales on 01/11/2017

After A Year of Anti-Choice Attacks, This Young Texas Latina Is Fighting Back

We're ready to fight back.

We’re ready to fight back.

I don’t actually remember what happened to the condom—just that it was on one minute and then not on the next. Afterward, when my boyfriend and I realized what had happened, we sat on the edge of his twin bed, half-dressed. I knew I wanted to buy some Plan B emergency contraception.

I was sixteen when this happened. As a teen in Texas, I had seen firsthand how hard it could be to get reproductive health care, especially if you are poor, young, undocumented, differently abled, LGBTQIA+, Black, Hispanic, or a person of color. The Supreme Court abortion case win this summer was a major triumph for reproductive justice, but Texas anti-choice politicians have since continued to attack  reproductive healthcare access in the state.

HB2, …

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Feminism | Posted by Hannah Hildebolt on 10/11/2016

The Period Problem

Let’s talk about period stigma.

Let’s talk about periods. No, not the punctuation mark — I’m talking about blood. Menstruation. You know what I mean.

It’s a touchy subject, isn’t it? Especially with boys. God, I mean you so much as mention a tampon around most guys and it’s game over. They can barely look you in the eye. Why is that, though? Menstruation is a perfectly natural process. It happens to lots of people, including women, transgender men, and nonbinary people of all shapes and sizes. However, due to the fact that sex and gender have been intertwined throughout history in many different cultures, menstruation is most often associated with women. Combine this association with the systemic degradation and stigmatization of womanhood, and one can see why menstruation has …

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Creative | Posted by Vicki S on 09/19/2016

Meet The Teen Artist Tackling Everyday Sexism In Her Work

19-year-old Röra Blue first caught the Internet’s attention with her jarringly honest photo series, “The Unsent Project.” The project, which has already accumulated thousands of submissions, is a collection of unsent text messages to first loves. First launched on Tumblr, users can now submit their unsent texts directly through Röra’s website: They can choose the color of their message, type their unspoken words to first significant others, and can then print them into stickers.

The Unsent Project: https://www.instagram.com/p/9Y7H_tFvCy/

The Unsent Project: https://www.instagram.com/p/9Y7H_tFvCy/

Recently, Röra has focused her attention on a new, more feminist-minded project: “Handle With Care.

According to Röra’s website, “Handle With Care” seeks to capture sexist comments — literally. Her photos asks viewers to pay attention to sexism by forcing them to engage with and critique many …

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