Feminism | Posted by Hannah Hildebolt on 10/11/2016

The Period Problem

Let’s talk about period stigma.

Let’s talk about periods. No, not the punctuation mark — I’m talking about blood. Menstruation. You know what I mean.

It’s a touchy subject, isn’t it? Especially with boys. God, I mean you so much as mention a tampon around most guys and it’s game over. They can barely look you in the eye. Why is that, though? Menstruation is a perfectly natural process. It happens to lots of people, including women, transgender men, and nonbinary people of all shapes and sizes. However, due to the fact that sex and gender have been intertwined throughout history in many different cultures, menstruation is most often associated with women. Combine this association with the systemic degradation and stigmatization of womanhood, and one can see why menstruation has …

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Creative | Posted by Vicki S on 09/19/2016

Meet The Teen Artist Tackling Everyday Sexism In Her Work

19-year-old Röra Blue first caught the Internet’s attention with her jarringly honest photo series, “The Unsent Project.” The project, which has already accumulated thousands of submissions, is a collection of unsent text messages to first loves. First launched on Tumblr, users can now submit their unsent texts directly through Röra’s website: They can choose the color of their message, type their unspoken words to first significant others, and can then print them into stickers.

The Unsent Project: https://www.instagram.com/p/9Y7H_tFvCy/

The Unsent Project: https://www.instagram.com/p/9Y7H_tFvCy/

Recently, Röra has focused her attention on a new, more feminist-minded project: “Handle With Care.

According to Röra’s website, “Handle With Care” seeks to capture sexist comments — literally. Her photos asks viewers to pay attention to sexism by forcing them to engage with and critique many …

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Feminism | Posted by Julia Bluhm and Izzy Labbe on 09/9/2016

The Power Of Intergenerational Activism

Julia Bluhm and Izzy Labbe

Julia Bluhm and Izzy Labbe

We are former SPARK Movement activists and Hardy Girls Healthy Women Girls Advisory Board members. In 2012 we served key roles in SPARK’s Seventeen Magazine action that garnered over 86,000 petition signatures and pushed the magazine to revise its policies on digitally altering the appearances of its models. We’re writing this blog in celebration of Powered By Girl, an ~awesome~ new book by our good friend Lyn Mikel Brown. Lyn was the guiding force for our introduction to intergenerational feminist activism at the age of thirteen.

Julia: We became involved with activism when we joined SPARK Movement as bloggers on topics such as body image and sexualization in the media. We were thirteen years old then, but we were surrounded by bloggers …

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Feminism | Posted by Vicki S on 07/12/2016

On The Ground: Interviews With Young Feminist Activists

Corinne Singer

Corinne Singer

Welcome to “On the Ground,” a new interview series that highlights the work young feminist activists are doing in their own communities.

“Before my sophomore year at Andover, I didn’t even know what the term ‘feminism’ meant,” feminist activist and Barnard College student Corinne Singer told me. “Although I grew up in feminist-structured house where my dad is a full-time caregiver and my mom is a full-time ‘breadwinner,’ we didn’t talk about gender in my house as a system of power.

But during Corinne’s sophomore year at her high school, Phillips Academy Andover, a group of 12 or so seniors started a movement on campus called F=E, Feminism Equals Equality. The group hosted forums, started a Facebook page that provided a space for people to post things …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Aph Ko on 01/20/2016

5 Tips For New Feminist Bloggers of Color

The case for feminist blogging.

I became a feminist at 16 years old. At the time, the word “feminist” wasn’t nearly as popular as it is today. In fact, I vividly remember trying to explain sexism and gender inequality to my high school friends outside of movie theaters and coffee shops — to blank stares.

When I was 17, I read Angela Davis’ auto-biography (as well as Women, Race, and Class) and felt my life and feminist identity evolve: I was provided with language for the pain I was feeling as a woman of color in a white supremacist patriarchy. I had an old typewriter which I used to write “articles” about my thoughts on society and power (although I would probably cringe if I were to read them …

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Feminism | Posted by Cheyenne T on 12/28/2015

How I Discovered The Power Of Black Womanhood

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Source: Flickr

After spending the last school year immersed in political turmoil and tension on my college campus, I decided this past summer that it was time to actively choose to either eject or change the things in my life that make me unhappy. So I did: I stopped wasting time on people who didn’t reciprocate the energy I put into our relationships and stopped participating in activities that were not directly contributing to my happiness of self-betterment.

In addition to rejecting negative influences, I decided to allow myself to indulge more in the people and daily activities that I enjoy, including things that are societally labelled as feminine, such as makeup and fashion. I initially rejected such practices upon first identifying as feminist because I thought they were at …

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Feminism | Posted by Cheyenne T on 10/2/2015

What I Learned From Hearing Angela Davis Speak

Angela Davis

A few weeks ago, I sat in the Chapel at Vassar College, surrounded by a multitude of individuals with varying intersectional identities and causes, listening to feminist scholar Angela Davis speak. The talk — entitled “Our Feminisms: From #occupy to #sayhername” — touched upon a variety of relevant issues, ranging from the Israel-Palestine conflict to #SayHerName to #BlackLivesMatter. Davis used black feminist theory to string many social justice movements together, arguing that our feminisms, whether state-sanctioned or not, are interwoven and have the potential to be transnational.

While the talk touched on many important points, a few particularly stuck with me. The first was that in order to revolutionize state systems and achieve true liberation, we need to dismantle, redefine and ultimately reimagine the systems on which they …

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Feminism | Posted by Sabrina N on 07/20/2015

The Problem With Rainbow-Tinted Facebook Profile Pictures

Screen Shot 2015-07-18 at 12.47.32 PM

The rainbow-tinted filter.

In the wake of the historic Supreme Court decision to universally legalize same-sex marriage, 26 million Facebook users demonstrated their support by superimposing a rainbow-tinted flag over their profile pictures.

On the one hand, this seemed like an inspiring indication of progress: It quickly, easily, and publicly allowed people to show their support for the SCOTUS decision as well as LGBTQ+ rights more broadly. It functioned both as a symbol of celebration and declaration of one’s stance on an important social issue. A profile picture isn’t a vote, a petition, or even an impassioned status, but it is a way for people who might not otherwise do anything to subtly state their opinion. Changing one’s picture could also inspire others to start a conversation, change their own …

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