Pop-Culture | Posted by Kinder L on 08/25/2015

How Television Continues to Normalize Eating Disorders

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_21wWPHQZI

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_21wWPHQZI

“Please don’t hurl too much, because if you get any thinner I’m gonna start looking fat,” Brooke, the head cheerleader in the show One Tree Hill, nonchalantly says to her best friend in an early episode. It’s unclear if her friend really is bulimic, but regardless, viewers learn that purging isn’t the issue — making your best friend look “fat” is.

Even young viewers are targeted: The seventh episode of the Disney Channel show Shake It Up portrays a model who, in awe of the two thirteen-year-old main characters, declares that she “could just eat you guys up! You know, if I ate.” The entire cast laughs. Refusing to eat is normalized, not raised as a point of concern or serious issue.

The truth of the matter is …

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Feminism | Posted by Allie J. on 05/20/2015

Why Sexist Dress Codes Have Got To Go

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Stop policing my body.

Shopping for school clothes was a nightmare in high school. Attending a private Christian school with a strict dress code, I had a lot of rules to follow: No jeans, sweat pants, yoga pants, or anything tight, revealing, or body forming. Basically nothing that was in style or readily available in stores.

Yet despite following the dress code to the best of my ability, I was still told that my pants were too tight, my shirt too low, or my skirt too short. I vividly remember being taken aside one day on the way to chapel to kneel down and have my skirt measured with a ruler. It was humiliating. I was told my favorite Old Navy skirt was a quarter of an inch too short, …

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Feminism | Posted by Mackenzie H on 05/13/2015

The Problem With ‘Strong Is The New Skinny’

Via Flickr

Let’s stop idealizing bodies altogether

The “ideal figure” of a woman has changed a lot over the years. But beauty has undeniably always been determined in relation to patriarchal standards.

During the Italian Renaissance, fuller figures were determined to be a direct reflection of one’s husband’s social and economic status and therefore plump bodies were considered ideal. By the Victorian Era, the hourglass figure — made possible by corsets — was popular. In the 1920s, when women won the right to vote, a sort of curve-less, boyish figure was fashionable. Marilyn Monroe arguably popularized a curvy figure with a slim waist but then the 1960s saw the origins of the skinny, tall, supermodel look that has since dominated the image of the “ideal figure” of a woman in Western culture …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 03/25/2015

Lena Dunham, Mindy Kaling and the Importance of Live Panels

I’m a fan of both Lena Dunham and Mindy Kaling. Yet I found myself somewhat surprised by just how impressive I found both women while recently watching their contributions to a Sundance live panel moderated by Emily Nussbaum via YouTube. I tried to pinpoint why exactly I was so taken with the extent to which I found both women endearingly self-aware, thoughtful and humble.

Perhaps, I finally realized, it had something to do with the panel format itself. Instead of answering the typical lazily sexist questions both women are frequently asked — like about existing as a female in Hollywood or what it was like to work with [insert male co-star here] — these talented individuals were given open platforms to discuss substantive issues they actually care about. Dunham, Kaling …

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Feminism | Posted by Pippa B on 03/18/2015

How Weightlifting Helped One College Student Overcome Her Eating Disorder

When Nika Shelby, a student at Union College, started weightlifting it wasn’t to get fit. She was fighting to save her life.

In high school, her friends knew her as a powerhouse. She was the strongest member of any team and a force to be reckoned with. But the parts of her body that gave her strength — the thick legs and strong arms that identified her as an athlete — were also her greatest enemies. Determined to attain the body that she wanted, Nika pulled away from sports and retrained her laser focus on getting skinny.

She was good at it too. She spiraled into a destructive eating disorder complete with food-free days and an Adderall prescription obtained with the intent of appetite suppression. She successfully sent her metabolism …

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Feminism | Posted by Carolina G on 03/16/2015

If You’re Latina, Then Why Are You White?

A few weeks ago, I was at a party with a few of my friends. I had been casually using a new dating app and had been talking to a guy that seemed pretty nice. He mentioned that he happened to be out in the same area, so I told him where I was, figuring we could have a drink. He arrived with a few of his friends and I said hello. The first words out of his mouth? “False advertising. You’re not Latina.”

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Photo Credit: Wikimedia Sofia Vergara

I wish I could say this surprised me but it really didn’t. Ever since I joined the world of online dating, my ethnicity is question

You may be thinking, “Oh, a white girl is complaining about being white.” That’s not the …

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Feminism | Posted by Sarah Landrum on 03/4/2015

These 10 Forms of Sexism Are Why I Identify As A Feminist

To say sexism and gender-based discrimination don’t exist would be like claiming oceans aren’t wet. There are, in fact, many issues facing women of the present, and they need to be addressed. So thank you, feminism, for acknowledging the many problems facing women today.

Without feminism, these important topics — like victim blaming, unequal pay and abortion — would be silently slid under the rug and our world would be way worse off. So let’s face these obstacles head-on, like the strong and empowered individuals we are.

Body Image

The media sucks. Thanks to stick-thin models and Photoshopping to boot, women have come to covet dangerously thin bodies. We battle with it constantly, as acquiring these body types requires nothing short of starvation. When we consider that as many as …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Pippa B on 12/3/2014

Is This Barbie Alternative Really Progress?

A second-grader with the Lammily doll: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jue_JlxnPGM

Lammily, a crowdfunded plastic doll based on the proportions of an average 19-year-old girl (according to CDC data), has been named the new Barbie by dozens of top publications. Trading a tiny waist and permanently heeled feet for a more athletic figure, Lammily strives to show young girls that “reality is cool.” The doll’s creator, Nickolay Lamm (age 26), came up with the design when he witnessed first hand the lack of realistic dolls on the market — a problem that has been increasingly spotlighted as body positive movements gain momentum. While Lamm’s doll is more realistically proportioned, it still falls far short of the lofty goals he set for it.

One of the most problematic issues with this doll is …

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