Pop-Culture | Posted by Kinder L on 11/3/2014

An Open Letter To Urban Outfitters

Dear Urban Outfitters,

My thirteen-year-old self thanks you for having provided trendy, vintage looking clothing at an affordable price. You are cheaper than Aritzia, edgier than American Apparel, and were undoubtedly my favorite clothing store. Were.

I am now a legal adult. I can vote, buy cigarettes and decide my own bedtime. I was raised with the ability to distinguish between “right” and “wrong” and I would like to believe that I’m a good person. Don’t get me wrong: I’m not perfect and the line between good and bad became a little blurry when I was a younger teen. But as I’ve matured, I’m confident that I’ve become adept at judging when something is just not right.

How dare you make shirts baring the words “Eat Less.” Did you know …

More >

Pop-Culture | Posted by Carolina G on 10/31/2014

Subway: Please Don’t Use Halloween To Make Women Feel Fat

Whether it’s the annoyingly catchy five-dollar footlong jingle or Jared Fogle’s promise that you will lose weight by eating sandwiches, Subway commercials are abundantly recognizable in our culture. These advertisements have ranged from harmless, to annoying, to misleading (sorry, the Subway diet doesn’t seem plausible to me) but the latest addition to the repertoire has been attracting a lot of negative press for being sexist and sizeist.

In order to capitalize on Halloween, Subway recently released a commercial in which a woman calls out two of her coworkers for eating burgers. She advises them that in order to be thin for Halloween costume season, they should eat Subway. She then explores her costume options, which include an “Attractive Nurse, Spicy Red Riding Hood, Viking Princess Warrior, Hot Devil, Sassy …

More >

Feminism | Posted by Pippa B on 08/4/2014

The Feminist Case for Home Economics

Home Economics, renamed Family and Consumer Sciences in 1994, had its heyday in the mid-1900s. It was taught in almost all schools and offered as a major in college. Unfortunately, despite being conceived as a way to validate the work that stay-at-home mothers (or homemakers) were doing, it was vilified as a degree in glorified housekeeping and began to disappear towards the turn of the century. Today, while as many as 80% of high school students (including boys and girls) are enrolled in Home Ec. classes, the completion of such classes has declined 38% nationwide.

My mandatory Home Ec. classes served me well. They taught my classmates and me useful skills like how to use a sewing machine, embroider, and cook. They have also drawn more scrutiny than any …

More >

Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 09/3/2011

Saturday Vids: K-Y Intense Features A Lesbian Couple

There's been a lot of talk recently in the feminist blogosphere about K-Y Intense's new commercial. K-Y has been airing commercials that feature "real" couples who use their product for some time now, but this is their first video that features a gay couple. What's more, and what sets this commercial apart from virtually all other representations of gay couples on TV, this lesbian couple is not eroticized or featured solely for the enjoyment of a male audience. It's actually kind of sweet. Or as sweet as what is still ultimately an attempt to sell people shit can be. Check it out:

More >

Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 07/16/2011

Saturday Vids: An FBomber’s Persuasive Speech

Rhiannon W. sent me this video, writing:

My English final was a persuasive speech. I did why you should boycott Abercrombie and their ilk. I used The FBomb as a resource, so I hope you like it!

This is so awesome. I love that an FBomber brought one of our conversations, and her take on it, to her own classroom! Check it out:

More >

Pop-Culture | Posted by Emma K on 04/21/2011

The J. Crew Controversy

the clearly evil photo in question

A recent J. Crew promotional email showed a picture of the company’s president and creative director Jenna Lyons laughing with her 5-year-old son, Beckett. A bottle of Essie nail polish is juxtaposed with their photo. The caption of this spread reads, “Lucky for me I ended up with a boy whose favorite color is pink. Toenail painting is so much more fun in neon.” For most, this image, shown at left, depicts a loving mother and her son sharing a fun and sweet moment together, but some social conservatives have labeled the image as “blatant propaganda celebrating transgendered children.” This statement comes from an article written by Erin R. Brown for the website of the Culture and Media Institute, whose mission is …

More >

Pop-Culture | Posted by Fiona L on 04/14/2011

How Effective Is A Girlcott Anyway?

push-up bikini tops for 7-year-olds: what exactly are they pushing up?

push-up bikini tops for 7-year-olds: what exactly are they pushing up?

Abercrombie & Fitch and American Apparel have done it again. In the past, Abercrombie & Fitch has come under criticism for T-shirts with racist and sexist sayings, thongs for girls as young as ten, and semi-nude advertisements in their catalogs. In 2005, the Women and Girls association of Pennsylvania led a “girlcott” against sexist T-shirts, which read “Who needs brains when you’ve got these?” and “I had a nightmare I was a brunette.” Abercrombie & Fitch eventually pulled the shirts. Now, Abercrombie & Fitch has decided to sell push-up bikini tops for girls as young as seven (clearly a great idea, since the thongs for ten-year-olds went over so well).

The bikini tops which were originally …

More >

Pop-Culture | Posted by Elinor K on 07/22/2010

Femme Toxic: How To Be a Healthy & Environmentally Friendly Consumer

are these environmentally friendly / healthy? be a smart consumer!

are these environmentally friendly / healthy? be a smart consumer!

My name is Elinor Keshet and I’ve been an intern at FemmeToxic over the past several months. What’s FemmeToxic? Well, it’s a project that was started by Breast Cancer Montreal in partnership with Girls Action/Fille d’Action. It is a feminist, youth-oriented, and environmentally safe cosmetics movement with a focus on changing federal regulations.

FemmeToxic combines a feminist outlook with environmental ethics. It demands structural change and encourages its members and participants to question the products advertised to them and consumed by them. It is a unique cancer movement in that it caters to a younger audience of women unlike mainstream breast cancer movements. FemmeToxic believes:

“Every woman’s body is toxic, but it’s not our choice! FemmeToxic aims to raise

More >