Feminism | Posted by Dana B on 09/10/2012

The Wage Gap: It’s Personal

I remember looking at the male intern sitting beside me and being angry.

It was May 30, 2012, the second day of my summer internship. I was at the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee hearing on the Paycheck Fairness Act. A woman was testifying to members of Congress about how she was continually paid thousands of dollars less than her male coworker.

Let me remind you: it was May 2012. Not 1960.

The woman testifying was AnnMarie Duchon. She said, “I have a daughter and when she grows up and looks back at how Mommy didn’t have fair pay, I want her to think it was some historical event that was eradicated years ago.”

I looked at the male intern sitting next to me and wondered how it could …

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Feminism | Posted by Molly W on 08/8/2012

Chick-Fil-A: Not For Feminists, Either

If you’re like me, your Facebook newsfeed, your Twitter stream and your local news is surprisingly loaded with stories about fast food purveyor, Chik-fil-a. All kinds of opinions about Christianity, the definition of “family” or corporate executives using their millions to support anti-gay marriage organizations have sprouted into an extremely spirited debate.

As a gay lady myself though, all of this hubbub isn’t surprising. It was an open secret of sorts that the organization wasn’t exactly a friend of the LGBT community – they are closed on Sundays in observance of the Christian sabbath, which is uncommon now in most places. Rather, the news of a lawsuit against the company from a former employee alleging gender discrimination is what has me particularly irked.

Brenda Honeycutt’s suit for wrongful termination states …

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Feminism | Posted by Fiona L on 04/4/2012

To Educate A Girl

I’ve often wondered if those who are provided with less, make more with what they are given. A few weeks ago, I went to a screening of a documentary called To Educate A Girl, and was convinced once again of the life-changing importance of education for girls and women. More importantly, I also realized the incredible drive to learn that permeates communities where girls are not given such opportunities.

Filmmakers Frederick Rendina and Oren Rudavsky focused on the factors that inhibit girls around the world from getting an adequate education, through chronicling the stories of several girls in Uganda and Nepal, two countries emerging from violent civil wars.

To Educate a Girl begins with Manisha, a daughter of a brick-carrier in Nepal, who has been unable to attend school …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Bethan S on 02/29/2012

Yorkie: Not Just For The Blokie

The majority of us in the UK will remember the controversial 2002 campaign for the chunky, ‘King size, not Queen sized’ Yorkie chocolate bar. This campaign’s primary slogan stated daringly: ‘It’s Not For Girls’.

My younger brothers found the campaign a great novelty and drew amusement by purposefully eating the blue-wrapped bar with over-exaggerated pleasure while simultaneously boasting and proclaiming that because I was a girl, I wasn’t allowed to consume the chocolate. Be it petty child-like banter on display, it was clear that the story ran much deeper. Nestle (the company that makes the candy bar) pretty clearly implied through their slogans that women are inferior, if only to persuade males (in particular young male children) to purchase a chocolate bar.

The overall reaction to the campaign …

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Feminism | Posted by Katherine P on 01/16/2012

Is This Really What I’m Going To Face?

I’ve always wanted to be a historian, and not just your run of the mill historian but one that changes the study and review of the discipline. But I’ve faced a problem, it’s such a subtle problem that I almost missed it, but in hindsight I realise it’s something I need to tackle head on.

To begin with, you must meet my male friend, J, now J and I are best friends due to our love of history. In fact we both want to study it in university, the difference being that J wishes to be a teacher and I wish to be an academic. During my final year of High School, J and I and others were asked continually what we wished to study.

Friend: So, what do you …

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Feminism | Posted by Harriet S. Hughes on 10/12/2011

London Calling: Feminism Across The Pond

The political terrain of Britain is shifting beneath our feet. Children of the ‘80s and ‘90s will have no memory of anything comparable to the dramatic, fundamental transformation of our nation that’s currently taking place. In an atmosphere of such instability, where the media’s frantically trying to keep pace, women’s issues – sidelined at the best of times – are slipping further and further down the agenda. That’s where we come in: YouFem is a London-based feminist organisation, aiming to harness the political power of young people and draw women’s issues back into the light…and to have fun doing it.

The elections of 2010 landed us with a Conservative-Liberal Democrat Coalition. Since then, Britain has been made to swallow a manifesto that no-one voted for; we’re facing a tsunami of …

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Feminism | Posted by Zoe G on 06/7/2011

Cat-Calling In The Australian Senate

The date: 1st of June, 2011. The place: The Australian Senate.

Senator Penny Wong, Federal Minister for Finance and Deregulation, was speaking when she was interrupted. ‘If I could finish?’ she snapped with justified annoyance, glaring across the room. Immediately the room broke into a chorus of “oooh”, like a bunch of sniggering schoolboys.

Then Opposition Senator David Bushby made a meowing noise.

Gotta give props to Penny Wong – she let him have it: ‘It is just extraordinary. The blokes are allowed to yell but if a woman stands her ground, you want to make that kind of comment. It’s not schoolyard politics, mate!’

The issue had been hotly debated in the Australian media. There is no doubt it was inappropriate, but there is argument over whether it …

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Feminism | Posted by Audrey S on 04/12/2011

The Opposite of a Crush

hateOnce, for an Introductory Sociology course, I gave a lecture about social oppression. It was fairly abstract. I didn’t talk about any specific kind of social oppression, like gender oppression or racial oppression or sexual oppression. I just talked about oppression, like what it is and how it works and what it feels like or rather what the philosopher Marilyn Frye says it is and how it works and what it feels like.

Using her classic metaphor I paraphrased that oppression was like, as Frye describes it, the “wires of a birdcage,” as she writes:

Cages … Consider a birdcage … If you look very closely at just one wire in the cage, you cannot see the other wires … If your conception of what is before you is

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