Feminism | Posted by Karla Majdancic on 07/22/2016

What Young People Need To Know About Brexit

Brexit.

When I heard about the UK referendum that took place in June, I thought the possibility of the UK leaving the EU must be a joke. I expected the population to vote to stay in the EU and I wasn’t alone. But the citizens of the UK decided to exit, shocking and shaking the world, and sparking a great deal of uncertainty by doing so. While the news of this event has mostly focused on the resulting political fallout and worldwide economic tumult, Brexit will also have a profound influence on a group the mainstream media rarely covers: the record number of refugees worldwide.

For the past year, Europe has been profoundly affected by a widespread refugee crisis. This crisis was primarily sparked by a civil war

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Feminism | Posted by Lauren D on 06/30/2016

Being An Ally Is About More Than Your Own Identity

It’s about action, too.

In the wake of the Orlando mass shooting and throughout this month of LGBTQPIA+ pride, I have seen an immense presence of online support and love for the LGBTQPIA+ community — support for which I am incredibly grateful. But I have also seen a number of perhaps well-intended, yet ultimately offensive, comments from self-identified “allies” — the majority of whom are apparently white, cisgender, or heterosexual/heteromantic. In this time of both tragedy and pride, it seems useful to discuss what it really means to be an ally.

Allyship is not just an identity — it requires action. An ally to the the LGBTQPIA+ community is someone who uses their cishet privilege to lift up the silenced voices in that community. Allies are allies because they do …

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Feminism | Posted by Karla Majdancic on 06/21/2016

Praise Young Girls For Being ‘Smart,’ Not ‘Pretty’

We’re still sending young girls restrictive, gendered messages.

For a long time, whenever I pictured an engineer I automatically imagined a guy who looked something like Mark Zuckerberg. I never imagined an engineer could be someone who looks like me. There are likely many causes for my assumption, but perhaps the most influential is the way our society still socializes girls to choose and strive for being beautiful over being intelligent.

Girls who choose to pursue science are perpetually viewed as nerdy loners — as anti-social, undesirable, and uninteresting­. These stereotypes are perpetuated by the gender norms at the heart of our societal expectations for girls, which are furthered by the media to which we’re exposed while growing up.

Take, for example, my favorite TV show as a child: Scooby

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Feminism | Posted by David G on 06/14/2016

What The Orlando Shooting Means To Me As A Queer Teen

#Orlando

On Sunday night, I couldn’t cry. I didn’t know how to — it was as if every resource I had to deal with deep, inescapable grief had been disabled. I felt short-circuited, wired and rewired out of my current plane of existence.

On Monday, I started breaking down.

A part of me feels like I’m infringing upon other people’s story. I’m not from Orlando and didn’t lose anyone, so I can’t possibly understand what my Orlando counterparts, those who are and did, are going through. And yet on Monday, I began to feel the grief someone feels when they lose a loved one: the void of anger and anguish and the thick fog of confusion. This complex entanglement of emotions weaved together, like vines climbing and suffocating a wall, …

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Feminism | Posted by Rachael H on 05/23/2016

Is A Digital Tool The Key To Addressing Campus Sexual Assault?

We need to address campus sexual assault.

The stark reality of the high rate of sexual assault on college campuses is nothing new, and neither is college administrations’ resistance to addressing it. Far too many students continue to seek support from their respective universities after they are assaulted on campus, but still fail to achieve any sense of justice. Survivors’ accounts of their assaults are scrutinized to the point of re-victimization and perpetrators still face inadequate consequences.

I’ve seen this firsthand. I know many female students at my own Canadian university who felt no sense of justice after reporting their sexual assaults to campus administrators. For example, concerns about seeing their perpetrator on campus were neither heard nor addressed. Multiple students instead received rather dismissive feedback along the lines of: …

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Feminism | Posted by Danika K on 04/29/2016

Why The Gender Gap In STEM Fields Still Exists

We need more women in STEM.

Women make up roughly 50 percent of the U.S. workforce, yet comprise only about 25 percent of American STEM workers — numbers that have even stagnated in recent years. Although some might claim this under-representation is due to a lack of academic accomplishment, women actually earn 41 percent of all STEM PhD degrees. So where’s the disconnect?

The real problem seems to be what happens after graduation: Women don’t always choose to go into, or stay in, STEM careers. Women are statistically more likely than men to leave a career in science, technology, engineering, or math within one year of employment — nearly half of all women leave their STEM careers within months of starting, according to one study. As a result, …

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Feminism | Posted by Mai D on 04/27/2016

The Truth About Having “Bad” Hair

One brand of hair relaxer.

I am a young Senegalese woman with “kinky” hair — specifically, type 4A/4B according to Andre Walker’s hair chart  — and I have heard every comment in the book about it. Since preschool I have been told I have “bad hair” by everyone from Dominican hair stylists to my African family members who have constantly begged me to relax it in order to look “proper” and “decent.” No matter the specific critique, my hair has always been deemed wrong by others.

My older, female cousins were the first to influence my hair. I grew up with three older brothers and my mother usually kept my hair braided so neither of us had to think too much about it. At the ripe age of eight, however, …

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Feminism | Posted by David G on 04/13/2016

North Carolina and Mississippi Passed Discriminatory Bills, But I Refuse To Remain Silent

We refuse to remain silent.

North Carolina and Mississippi recently made headlines for signing two anti-LGBT+ bills into law. News outlets, prominent organizations and officials around the nation roundly decried these measures as discriminatory, as these bills — though they were framed as “religious freedom” bills — have the potential to drastically alter the treatment of LGBT+ individuals in the workplace, businesses, and courts.

North Carolina’s law, known as HB2, was passed after legislation that protected and expanded LGBT+ rights and was explicitly designed to disable cities from passing laws counteracting HB2 was passed in the city of Charlotte.

“In a single day, the governor and legislature of North Carolina unveiled, deliberated, passed, and signed into law a bill that activists have described as the most extreme anti-LGBT measure …

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