Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Paulina P on 02/24/2014

Body Positivity Looks Different For Each Person

I clearly did not wake up like this. There is liquid eyeliner on my eyes to create this cat eye, there is bronzer on my cheekbones to create the illusion that I have been in the sunlight, and there is fire-engine red lipstick on my lips to make me feel like Marilyn Monroe. But let me tell you, I feel fierce. I feel sexy. I feel unstoppable.

My friend and I recently held a Body Positive photo shoot campaign as a publicity event for the Eating Disorders Awareness and Body Positive Week we are organizing at Columbia University. Since the week is Feb. 24 to 27, we wanted to get people excited and involved before our week of events. We asked students to come in their most confident form and …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Hannah D on 09/16/2013

How Fashion IS A Feminist Issue

Fashion is so much more than just clothing and trends: it’s a feminist issue. The industry makes £20.9 billion for the British economy each year, and creates 816,000 jobs in the UK alone: however, the majority of women in the fashion industry are employed in the industry’s lowest paying jobs. And yet despite the fact that so many women are involved in fashion, it’s impossible to overlook the fact that the majority of the most successful people in fashion are male. For example, most of the top womenswear designers are male (Karl Lagerfeld, Tom Ford, Marc Jacobs, Ralph Lauren and Giorgio Armani, for example) as well as many of the best known fashion photographers (including Terry Richardson, Steven Meisel, Peter Lindbergh, Jeurgen Teller and Nick Knight). But beyond the composition …

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 07/29/2013

Model Citizen

I would like to preface this essay by saying that I am a feminist (I have written four other articles for the FBomb), I am sixteen, and I have been model with Ford Models for two years. My opinions are based on experiences I have personally had in the fashion industry.

Mankind has always been infatuated with beauty and art has been one way humans create beauty since the beginning of history — what pleases the eye, touches the soul after all. To me, fashion is the most intimate form of art because it becomes a part of our lives in a way other art doesn’t: we experience life in clothes. People strive to see and create beauty in their lives and fashion is one way to accomplish that.…

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Leora M on 08/3/2012

Dear Anthropologie: A Letter of Complaint

Dear Anthropologie (and all other stores pertaining to this issue),

I love your store. I love the scent when you walk in, the feel of the material, and the creative way everything is displayed. I love the candles, the sweaters, the doorknobs, the dresses, the high-heels, the many patterns, and the painted dishes. I love getting the catalog in the mail and dreaming about a reality in which I, too, am able to pitch my tent in the tide of the Bahamas, just because it would be a beautiful sight.

I am not complaining because I am one of those curvy, big-bosomed women who never see anyone their size in a magazine. I am a tall, petite young girl who usually fits in a size small, does not have to …

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Creative | Posted by Julie Z on 06/10/2012

Support Women Artists Sunday: Madison Maxey

Madison Maxey Inc, a growing fashion brand that creates unique blazers in fun and interesting cuts isn’t your typical fashion company.The brand was started by Madison Maxey, a 19 year old California native in December 2011. Her company is organized around one concept; “Blazers for the Individual.” All of her designs reflect the idea that the blazer can be a more creative garment than what most stores currently have to offer.

Says Maddison:  ”At age 8, I started learning to sew, and since then I would ask for sewing machines for Christmas instead of cell phones or make-up. I spent my summers sitting in on college classes to learn more about the industry and fashion and I devoured books written by my idols on how they started their companies. Instead …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Becka W on 07/5/2011

The Enigma of the Bra

Fashion is pain, and pain is beauty. Right?

I complimented a friend on a new sundress recently, and she thanked me and then showed me her clever solution to the dress’ lacy strap area – she put a scarf on to hide her bra peeking through. As cute as the ensemble was, there was that voice at the back of my head saying – why? Why does my friend have to have a whole other accessory in order to accomplish wearing a dress?

We all have outfits like this. I have 3 or 4 gorgeous dresses where a tank top is required underneath to ensure classy cleavage. 3 pairs of adorable heels where I need to make sure I’m wearing a band-aid on my heel. They’re small little sacrifices – …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Jenae S on 06/29/2011

Feminist Dilemma: An Addiction To It Girl

I’m a feminist and as such I try to make conscious decisions in my daily life that uphold feminist ideals. But then came It Girl. It Girl is a facebook game centered around fashion, partying, and dating. It is one of the few MMO-esque games marketed exclusively to women. The game is simple, create an avatar, buy clothes, go to parties, compete against other users. Yes, you compete against other users in “showdowns” where you can earn money and fame. You level up by shaming other girls with your fashion skills.

This game represents everything that I stand against. It Girl emphasizes style over substance. It Girl tells you that you can improve your reputation through the newest clothes or hottest boyfriends. Worst of all it pits you against other …

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Feminism | Posted by Fiona L on 06/2/2011

Running In Heels: Why Should Women Leaders Have To Look Like Barbies?

After recently attending an awards ceremony for a women’s political organization in Washington DC, and experiencing what some have coined a wardrobe malfunction, I’ve realized to an even further extent the lengths women are forced to go to appear effortlessly put together. Women politicians are constantly being picked apart for what they wear, whether it’s Michelle Obama’s election-night dress or Hillary Clinton’s “cleavage.” Women in general are expected to come off like they’ve somehow woken up in the morning looking like Barbie, but women in leadership have to seem like they floated out of bed looking like Senator Barbie—and I can tell you from the experience I had last week, that looking like Senator Barbie can take a whole lot of effort.

As an alumna of the Running

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