Feminism | Posted by Corinne Singer on 10/5/2016

A Reflection on the 2016 Olympics Through a Disabled Lens

Credit: Corinne Singer

Credit: Corinne Singer

So much of my identity is contingent upon my strength. Before the development of my disability, I filled all of my spare time with sports. I played everything–competitively. My pride was deeply rooted in a rough exterior and an ability to perform physically that set me apart from many of my peers. At the age of thirteen, however, the discovery of stress fractures, joint dysfunctions, and other similar issues completely uprooted me from an identity I had worked so tirelessly create.. I am now unable to perform any sort of physical activity beyond the boundaries of physical therapy. My story is just one of approximately one billion of those of us who experience some form of a disability.

As the 2016 summer Olympics progressed, articles regarding sexism …

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 07/15/2016

Serena Williams and Gabby Douglas Are Proving Black Girls Are Magic

Gabby Douglas.

There is absolutely no question that racism still persists in the United States today. While examples of this systemic reality abound — from racism in the criminal justice system to the disproportionate punishment of black girls in schools and beyond — one need look no further for evidence than this past week, which saw the tragic deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castille. In fact, the police have killed at least 136 black people in 2016 alone, according to the Guardian.

Perhaps now more than ever, therefore, it’s important for young, black Americans to have exposure to black people succeeding despite the many systemic barriers in their way. This seems especially important for women of color, who are so often erased even from discussions of liberation.

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Feminism | Posted by Danika K on 03/7/2016

Why Are Women’s Sports Still Not Covered In The Media?

The 2015 Women’s World Cup

More people tuned in to watch the FIFA Women’s World Cup in 2015 than any other soccer game shown on English-language television in this country in recorded history. The entire event garnered a record 750 million viewers — a seemingly clear indication that women’s sports are worthy of receiving as much televised coverage as do men’s sports.

Even though viewers are clearly interested in women’s sports, however, coverage of these events has only decreased since 1989. One University of Southern California study aptly titled It’s Dude Time! analyzed 25 years of sports media coverage and discovered that women were covered less in 2014 than in 1989. In fact, less than one percent of network television coverage included women’s athletics in 2014 and ESPN’s SportsCenter featured …

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Feminism | Posted by Mackenzie H on 05/13/2015

The Problem With ‘Strong Is The New Skinny’

Via Flickr

Let’s stop idealizing bodies altogether

The “ideal figure” of a woman has changed a lot over the years. But beauty has undeniably always been determined in relation to patriarchal standards.

During the Italian Renaissance, fuller figures were determined to be a direct reflection of one’s husband’s social and economic status and therefore plump bodies were considered ideal. By the Victorian Era, the hourglass figure — made possible by corsets — was popular. In the 1920s, when women won the right to vote, a sort of curve-less, boyish figure was fashionable. Marilyn Monroe arguably popularized a curvy figure with a slim waist but then the 1960s saw the origins of the skinny, tall, supermodel look that has since dominated the image of the “ideal figure” of a woman in Western culture …

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Feminism | Posted by Abby H on 04/6/2015

I Am Proud to Throw Like a Girl

female athletes deserve recognition

Female professional athletes in this nation do not get the recognition they deserve. As a female athlete who competes at the collegiate level, I know first hand that women’s sports just do not get the same amount of attention that men’s sports do in this country.

Female athletes certainly put the same amount of time and effort into our training, but we don’t reap the same benefits because of the legacy of a vicious cycle that positions women’s sports as inferior to men’s. As an athlete, it’s hard enough to commit myself to a team day in and day out, but it is even tougher when there are minimal fans to cheer the team on. For example, my college’s women’s lacrosse games get less than half …

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Feminism | Posted by Sophia C on 11/7/2014

Where Are the Women in Skate Parks?

A woman in skateboarding isn’t something you hear about often. It’s a male-dominated sport and this fact has ingrained a certain mindset in skating culture. Despite this, I have always been interested in skateboarding. My older cousins always skated and in high school I drifted towards “skater” kids because I always found them to be surprisingly smart and very accepting. However, a recent trip to my local skate park changed my view on the sport and some of the people who participate in it.

My friends invited me to come to the skate park after school and I was wary because every time I’ve been there, it’s been a little boring — I broke my old board and am terrible at bowl skating anyways. My friend Matt told me he …

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 01/8/2014

Women’s Football: Feminist or Sexist?

Football seems to be the sport that excludes women the most.  In this day in age we have women’s leagues for softball, baseball, and the WNBA, but football always had men in the spotlight being cheered on by cheerleaders on the sidelines.  However, this is no longer the case.  The Legends Football League, founded in 2009, is a women’s tackle American football league.  These women are passionate about football, and they have a place to play: games are played in the spring and summer in professional men’s arenas and stadiums including those of the NFL.

In many ways the LFL seems like a feminist victory: giving women an opportunity to play football at a high level appears to be a step towards equality. Most teams are coached by former …

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Feminism | Posted by Emily Rose on 03/27/2013

Why My High School Needs Roller Derby

Roller derby is empowering: see Whip It for reference

I go to a public high school, and have recently expressed interest to the administration in starting a school roller derby team. However, I was first met with resistance and then refusal by the authorities. The general assessment was the sport was too dangerous for the public school to allow. However, when one takes a look around, they will see that football is a high priority. How different are these two sports, really? Both are contact sports, and despite its portrayal in the media, roller derby does have rules prohibiting certain potentially dangerous moves. The biggest difference to those who have been asked is that one is played primarily by males, who are considered “tough” enough to play a contact sport, …

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