Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 08/25/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Clara Engel

Clara Engel

Toronto-born Clara Engel, a multi-faceted artist whose musical voice is guided by the likes of Jacques Brel, Robert Johnson and Diamanda Galas, is quickly gaining an online following and carving a niche for herself as a brave, bold, and innovative new voice. Both fierce and delicate, her music is reminiscent of an era in history when theatre, art, and sound were an integral part of a bigger, more vital whole; an era that the 21st century is craving more than ever.

- via Last.Fm

“I Keep On Trying”

“Blind Me”

Clara Engel on BandCamp: http://claraengel.bandcamp.com/

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 08/4/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Sarah Dugas

Sarah and Christian Dugas

Though these two Dugas siblings have made quite the sound waves each in their own right, you always know that when they are apart, it’s only temporary. Sure enough, in 2007, their respective joining of the Canadian Juno-winning and Grammy-nominated, The Duhks, was staggered over a mere couple of seasons.

Hailing from the French quarters of Winnipeg, Canada, they grew up on a varied regimen of vinyl records, courtesy of their musician parents. While never denying their wide-ranging musical tastes, they vicariously immersed themselves in Southern music and this unmistakable connection expanded into a full-blown musical path. They have since shared the stage with the likes of John Paul Jones, Los Lobos, The Dirty Dozen Brass Band, The Wood Brothers, The Blind Boys of Alabama, Arrested

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 07/14/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Reesa Renee

Reesa Renee is an artist, musician, songwriter, and lyrical poet from the DC Metropolitan Area. Her voice skims through the soulful sounds of the jazz era and then fast-forwards your musical clocks to the more modern sounds of the R&B greats of today. Add that to an energetic ensemble of musical harmonies and undertones and you get an amazing experience. Reesa Renee launched her solo career in 2011, and in October, became the first person to win the prestigious Amateur Night at the Apollo in three years with an original song, Got Me Loose.

She has performed alongside of musical greats Eric Roberson, Raheem DeVaughn, Chuck Brown, Roy Ayers and Wale. Reesa Renee received 3 nominations from the Washington Area Music Association for: Debut Album, Urban Contemporary Vocalist & Urban

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 06/23/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Elliphant

Elliphant

Sounding like the twisted illegitimate offspring of MIA and Diplo – as deliciously fierce as the former but as intelligently playful as the latter – Elliphant pulls the balls of this dancehall slayer through its own throat and ties them in a cherry knot the other side.

Ellinor Olovsdotter slowly morphed into Elliphant through the course of a long (and lost) summer travelling in the UK with only a dubstep soundsystem for company. After falling in love with the urban music sounds of London she returned home to Stockholm, on Sweden’s East Coast, boasting sizzling MC skills and some serious lyrical prowess.

Now, having already won over the likes of Dazed & Confused ["all abstract lyrcisms and cheap dirty beats"], NME “[amazing'"], Pitchfork “[Elliphant sound like nothing but the

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 06/2/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Lianne La Havas

La Havas was born in London, England to a Greek father and Jamaican mother. She was raised in Tooting and Streatham, spending the majority of her time with her grandparents following her parents’ separation as a child. La Havas began singing at seven and cites her parents’ diverse musical tastes as having the biggest influence on her music. Her mother played with Jill Scott and Mary J. Blige, and her father, an accomplished multi-instrumentalist, taught her the basics of guitar and piano. Lianne wrote her first song at the age of 11, but did not learn to play the guitar until she was 18 years old. Lianne attended Norbury Manor Business and Enterprise College for Girls in Croydon, where she studied art A-level, and planned to take an art foundation

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 04/28/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Nadine Shah

Nadine Shah

Of Norwegian and Pakistani ancestry, British born Nadine Shah is an uncompromising vocalist/composer hailing from a small coastal village in the North East of England called Whitburn. Her dark tales of love, loss and lust are fast earning her favourable comparisons such as ‘the female Nick Cave’. Sonically, she counts her inspirations as artists such as Scott Waker, PJ Harvey and Dirty Projectors, though lyrically her tales are better informed by love, tragedy, the sea and more abstractly the works of Philip Larkin and Frida Kahlo. ?Nadine is currently working on her debut album with producer Ben Hillier.

via MySpace

Dreary Town

Aching Bones

Nadine Shah on iTunes: Nadine Shah

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 04/21/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: AlunaGeorge

George Reid and Aluna Francis

AlunaGeorge, featuring chanteuse Aluna Francis, is quickly becoming one of the breakout bands of 2013. Consisting of Francis and producer George Reid, the electronica group combines intimate vocals with synthesized pop, house, R&B, and dub-step. Though already pretty big in the UK—the duo nabbed second in BBC’s Sound of 2013 contest—Francis’ voice will likely get way more air time in the US in the coming year.

Francis, who is half Indian and half Jamaican, worked as a reflexologist and previously sang for the band My Toys Like Me. She first met Reid when he remixed one of My Toys’ songs, and they paired up and released their first commercial single (“Your Drums, Your Love,” above) late last year. Though minimalist and futuristic, AlunaGeorge’s songs

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 04/14/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Lake Street Drive

Lake Street Drive

Hailing from such disparate locales as Tennessee (Price), Iowa (Kearney), Minneapolis (Olson), and Philadelphia (Calabrese), Lake Street Dive first gathered in a room together when they were students at Boston’s New England Conservatory. “Mr. McDuck assembled the four of us, said we were now Lake Street Dive, and we were a ‘free country’ band,” Bridget Kearney remembers. “He wrote this on a chalkboard in the ensemble room that we had our first rehearsal in. We intended to play country music in an improvised, avant-garde style – like Loretta Lynn meets Ornette Coleman. It sounded terrible! But the combination of people and personalities actually made a lot of sense and we had a great time being around each other and making music together.”

Lake Street Dive makes the

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