Pop-Culture | Posted by David G on 02/10/2016

Why Beyoncé’s “Formation” Video Is So Important

Formation

Formation

This past Saturday, Beyoncé released the first new song from her upcoming album, entitled “Formation.” The song, and accompanying video, may be the most important works the star has released. If her 2013 eponymous album was the birth of her understanding of self empowerment and goal to empower other women, “Formation” indicates that she will only build on this mission and continue to forcefully declare her political views.

Many things make “Formation” special, but perhaps chief among them is Beyoncé’s evisceration of the respectability politics to which African American women are often subjected. The song can be interpreted as a much-needed declaration of defiance, both against the stereotypical, cultural expectations for African American women and against the idea that African-American women aren’t, and cannot be, leaders in …

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Feminism | Posted by Eliza V on 01/29/2016

It’s Time To Stop Excusing Sexism As A “Joke.”

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Mel McLaughlin and Chris Gayle

Mel McLaughlin, a well-known and respected Australian sports commentator, was recently tasked with conducting a post-match interview with cricketer Chris Gayle. The reporter asked professional, thoughtful questions about the match — which Gayle ignored. The athlete instead took the opportunity to comment on McLaughlin’s appearance.

“Don’t blush, baby,” he said after asking her out on the air, commenting on her eyes, and making a number of other inappropriate comments. Although clearly uncomfortable, McLaughlin remained extremely professional throughout the ordeal. She ignored Gayle’s comments and asked more questions about the match. Unfortunately, her professionalism did little to deter Gayle from continuing to make unwanted advances.

After the clip aired, many expressed outrage on social media and Gayle’s own club even reprimanded him. But Gayle hardly …

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Feminism | Posted by Saskia G on 01/27/2016

Women in the Military Are Now Allowed to Step Up

Women in the military

On December 3rd, the U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter made a game-changing announcement for women in the military. All active combat roles, he proclaimed, would become open to women. They can now serve as infantry soldiers, Navy SEALS, Green Berets, and other Special Forces operatives in departments previously closed to them. This decision not only countered the military’s reputation as a sexist bastion of conservatism, but will also tangibly benefit women in the military’s careers by allowing them to rise to higher ranks than was previously possible.

Thanks to the Women’s Armed Services Integration Act, women have been allowed to enlist in the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines since 1948 – the same year official racial segregation in the armed forces ended. Women …

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Feminism | Posted by Caitlyn Martin on 01/25/2016

The Facts Every Young Woman Needs To Know About Medication Abortion

Medication abortion is a safe, optimal option for many women.

On Friday, women across the country commemorated the 43rd anniversary of the landmark Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion in the United States. Many noted that despite this legislation, however, abortion remains inaccessible for far too women in this country. A recent medical development, however, has the potential to dramatically empower young women’s to make the best reproductive choice possible — but a lack of information as well as perpetuated misinformation keep women from it.

This development is medication abortion, or the abortion pill, which has become available in the United States just the last 15 years. While more discussions about this pill are now emerging — from the media’s celebration of its 15th anniversary …

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Creative | Posted by Jo E on 01/22/2016

Bisexuality Isn’t Real, My Ass.

Somehow she ended up sitting next to me on the couch as the five of us snuggled. Three of us ended up on the L shaped couch, the other two on the floor. And there she was. Next to me, sitting back after she had gotten the movie—“The Shining”—set up on her TV.

It didn’t take long for me to forget about my discomfort and focus on the movie, which was good, and not so scary that I couldn’t watch. But then she grabbed my arm and pulled it around her, lying her body back against my chest, and I could smell how nice she smelled — she was obsessed with nice-smelling lotions and hair sprays. I tried not to let her feel the tension that she inspired in my …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Aph Ko on 01/20/2016

5 Tips For New Feminist Bloggers of Color

The case for feminist blogging.

I became a feminist at 16 years old. At the time, the word “feminist” wasn’t nearly as popular as it is today. In fact, I vividly remember trying to explain sexism and gender inequality to my high school friends outside of movie theaters and coffee shops — to blank stares.

When I was 17, I read Angela Davis’ auto-biography (as well as Women, Race, and Class) and felt my life and feminist identity evolve: I was provided with language for the pain I was feeling as a woman of color in a white supremacist patriarchy. I had an old typewriter which I used to write “articles” about my thoughts on society and power (although I would probably cringe if I were to read them …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Chloe H on 01/15/2016

How Young, Female Photographers Are Carrying On A Powerful Legacy

There’s a strong legacy of female photographers.

The Musée de l’Orangerie is a renowned art gallery in Paris, France. Although it’s best known for housing Monet’s “Water Lilies,” the gallery is currently featuring an exhibit entitled “Who’s Afraid of Women Photographers? 1839-1919.” I was fortunate enough to see the exhibit, which includes the work of 75 female photographers — some famous, some unknown. The featured artists managed to overcome the sexist expectations and prejudices that were part and parcel of the era in which they worked and laid the groundwork for an industry in which female artists have continued to thrive.

Although relatively little attention has been paid to their work, many women have thrived as photographers over the past century. While many women discovered the art form …

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Feminism | Posted by Saskia G on 01/13/2016

What Does Voting Really Mean? A Look At Saudi Arabian Women’s First Election

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Saudi Arabian women voters

Saudi Arabia is known for limiting women’s rights. Women who live in the conservative Islamic nation must wear an abaya, a full-length black cloak covering their hair and body, and an additional scarf over the face is optional but recommended. Women cannot travel, marry, or attend university without permission from male family members. As protests recently revealed, many Saudi Arabian women also still cannot drive, despite a tentative new policy meant to enforce the right.

But as of 2015, they can vote. What’s more, they can run for office.

Saudi Arabia is one of the last nations in the world to grant women suffrage. Although the nation held its first election since 1964 just a decade ago in 2005, according to BBC, women were not …

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