Feminism | Posted by Kylie V on 04/16/2014

Why We Must Speak Out

I love Sara Bareilles’ Brave. Who doesn’t love a message about overcoming fear in order to express one’s opinions?

Say what you wanna say
And let the words fall out
Honestly I wanna see you be brave
With what you want to say
And let the words fall out
Honestly I wanna see you be brave

But why is simply expressing who we are and what we think interpreted as brave? Why is this so controversial that we have to be afraid of opposition? We live in a culture where backlash has become extremely harsh, especially when it means challenging the white middle class straight status quo. More than ever we need inspiration from brilliant thinkers like the late great Audre Lorde, who challenged us to push past the …

More >

Feminism | Posted by Julia B on 04/14/2014

Not “Crazy,” Just Dedicated

When girls are young, Cinderella tells them “dreams really do come true.” As we get older, that philosophy changes and we learn that life isn’t actually a fairytale. You have to work hard in order to achieve something great, and even then it doesn’t always happen.  For me, ballet started as a fairytale and transformed into a whole lot of hard work. And I love it.

Like any professional-in-training, I spend about 20 hours per week training for what I dream of doing: becoming a professional ballet dancer. I don’t know if I’ll succeed (because the ballet world is extremely, extremely competitive), but either way I want to be able to say that I worked as hard as I possibly could.

People have said that I “have no life” outside …

More >

Feminism | Posted by Beatrice M on 04/9/2014

Are We Sexually Equal?

Women have made great strides towards social, political and economic equality in the past decades, but where do we stand in terms of sexual equality? Humans are sexual creatures who all want to explore our sexuality, but society undeniably still influences many women and men to view sex differently.

While medical advancements, like the invention of the pill, have radically transformed women’s sexual autonomy, there are still a number of cultural forces that suppress women’s sexuality. Women are still sexually exploited in the media and there are still societal pressures that encourage us to think of men as overly sexual creatures and women as demure and untouchable. Rigid purity standards and sexual double standards continue to demonize women for having sex and women also still face greater repercussions for sexual …

More >

Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 04/7/2014

Girls: Do We Run The World?

I love Beyonce’s song Girls Run The World, it has an awesome chorus, a pumping beat, and a great message about the power of women. But unfortunately I think James Brown more accurately depicts our society today: it’s a man’s world. The majority of leadership positions across the board are held by men. This is painfully obvious when I read one of my favorite news sources: The Economist. The Economist is filled with stories about the most powerful and influential people in business in politics. But the vast majority of the people I read about are men. In the most recent issue of The Economist, there was an article about how Japanese women are the extreme minority in high powered political and business positions. The statistics

More >

Feminism | Posted by Maya Richard-Craven on 03/31/2014

Would You Change Your Name?

It all started after a commentator on Thought Catalog assumed I was married after reading one of my articles. Although the article focused on questions surrounding racial bias in college hook-up culture, there was a full-on discussion about my hyphenated last name, and how people “should never trust chicks with two last names.”

I couldn’t help but respond, just to clarify. I expressed how I am single, and that my last name is hyphenated because my mother wanted to keep her last name for professional reasons.

“Why is what she does for a living important? It’s a weird femmy move chicks do with the hyphen name. Some how they think it empowers them,” was the response.

This attitude led me to do some research on our generation’s attitudes towards changing …

More >

Feminism | Posted by Courtney B on 03/26/2014

What Exactly Do We Mean By Equal?

I am a feminist. I wear shirts that say “Riots not Diets” and tweet articles about women’s issues. I am the founder of the feminist club on the campus of my women’s college. I could probably take someone down with my feminist, pro-equality, social justice rhetoric. But it seems to me that there is a disconnect between fighting for these issues, for women, men, and trans*people to have equal opportunities, in my relatively comfortable feminist bubble and the real world.

I want to kick and scream about women’s issues because I am a woman, and damnit, you better hear me roar. But by doing this, I feel like I’m also ostracizing myself from the rest of the world, like I’m counter-productively labeling myself as different when I’m ultimately fighting for …

More >

Feminism | Posted by Kennedy H on 03/24/2014

What Feminism Really Means

While teens, adults and even celebrities alike dare to mistakenly claim that feminism means  loathing men and believing that women are worth more than men, I believe that feminism is simply about equality: it’s about the power to be strong, confident and aspire to be anything and do anything independently.

Even though feminist activists have fought for equality for years, it’s clear equality has yet to be achieved. One of the most obvious and pervasive examples is the portrayal of women in the media: advertisements overwhelmingly undermine women and the media generally insists on portraying women as sex objects. How many ads have you seen where a woman is half naked (if not completely naked) without any contextual relation to the product being sold? Another example is the classic double …

More >

Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 03/22/2014

Saturday Vids: The Girls of Atomic City

I personally love uncovered stories of how women shaped history, which is why I’m adding The Girls of Atomic City to my reading list. The book covers how at the height of WWII, thousands of young girls – many in their teens – were recruited to the secret city of Oak Ridge, TN, enticed by solid wages and the promise of war-ending work.  Each girl was given a specific role and forbidden to ask about its ultimate goal or discuss with anyone else.  Kept in the dark, the girls were completely unaware what their individual roles were working together to accomplish until the atomic bomb was dropped. Denise Kiernan reveals the story behind the first Manhattan Project which began in NYC in 1942.

Related Posts with Thumbnails

Related Posts with Thumbnails

More >

no prescription buy viagra