Feminism | Posted by Eliza V on 09/19/2014

My Non-Feminist Sister

I like to think that feminism is becoming a topic of household discussion now. Celebrities are increasingly claiming the feminist label, sexist media depictions are causing more of an uproar and feminism itself seems to be appearing in the news now more than in recent years. This is all very well and good, but it certainly doesn’t change the fact that there are still people who want nothing to do with feminism.

This can be very hard to deal with for people who do identify as feminists, especially if those people happen to be in your family. While it’s (unfortunately) probably not uncommon to have a family member who is against feminism, it’s an especially difficult situation when that person is in your immediate family and somebody you’re otherwise close …

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Awareness, Feminism | Posted by Trip E on 09/15/2014

#WhyIStayed: Understanding Domestic Violence

Janay and Ray Rice

On March 27th, 2014, former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice was arrested and indicted for third-degree aggravated assault. He had punched his fiancee, Janay Palmer, in the face, knocking her unconscious. Shortly afterward the assault in February, a video of Ray Rice dragging Palmer out of an elevator was released by TMZ. I have not watched this video, or the one released on Monday, because of a tweet I was lucky enough to see on my feed:

Rice was suspended for the first two games of the 2014 season, and the criminal …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Samantha M on 09/12/2014

The Problem With “Likes”

So many of my peers have an unhealthy obsession with how many “likes” their pictures (especially selfies) receive on Instagram. Many of my friends seem to give a simple “like” so much more weight than it deserves and plenty even equate the number of likes on their pictures with how attractive they are or whether or not people like them. I know teens who go so far as to delete their photo if it doesn’t receive a certain amount of likes in a given time period.

Letting social media interactions like this have so much influence on one’s life might seem ridiculous at first, but it’s evidence of something more serious. There is a lot of pressure on teen girls to feel beautiful and perfect, and for those things to …

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Feminism | Posted by Francesca on 09/10/2014

So She Did: The Female Mentor That Changed My Life

I always expected that I’d spend my last summer before starting college binge-watching TV, eating pizza, and dealing with anxiety about my freshman year.  Instead, I ended up exploring my recent acquaintance with the feminist movement through an internship with So She Did, an organization related to women’s empowerment. I decided to join the organization because it seemed like the perfect opportunity to get a different perspective on feminism and my own ideas about empowerment. Sure enough, working there resulted in one of the best and most interesting summers of my life.

So She Did focuses on a positive and personalized understanding of feminism: it emphasizes individual improvement by showing young women how to say no, how to make a great first impression, how to conquer their fears and …

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Feminism | Posted by Ines R on 09/5/2014

On Young Women Traveling Alone

Lima, Peru: more than a stereotype

“Be careful, you’re just a girl!” I heard this phrase far too many times this summer as I prepared to leave for Brazil and Peru. Every Spring Break since I can remember I’ve traveled to Peru, and I’m unfortunately used to people’s stereotypical and prejudiced conceptions of Peruvian culture: I’m pretty sure many of my childhood friends thought that I rode llamas, wore tribal clothing and climbed mountains for the duration of my visits. But this summer, I couldn’t tell if people were skeptical because I was traveling alone as a woman, or if they were just scared of Latin America in general since they saw it as too exotic and dangerous. Regardless, because I am both a woman and Latin American it was …

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe P on 08/22/2014

The Dangers of Internalized Misogyny

We need feminism now more than ever for many reasons, but rampant internalized misogyny — which often goes unnoticed and, in some situations, is even understood as social norms – is as good a reason as any.

Culturally, we seem to have just accepted that “sex sells.” But the media, advertising and other cultural institutions “sell sex” largely by demeaning women and causing them to feel ashamed about their bodies. For example, American Apparel is known for its sexually exploitive advertising and marketing. Take the sock and stocking section of their website. The female stocking model is portrayed doing an uncomfortable-looking acrobatic move with her thigh highs, while the male model merely wears socks on his feet. Images like these allow viewers to internalize ideas about women as passive …

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Feminism | Posted by Maya Richard-Craven on 08/8/2014

What Makes Asian-American Men ‘Undateable?’

When I look in the mirror, I do not see someone that I understand to be handsome by Western standards. I look mostly Asian, and like so many other heterosexual Asian males before me, I have internalized a lifetime of believing that my features, my face, my skin tone, in tandem, make me unattractive and undesirable.

- Noah Cho, “How I Learned to Feel Undesirable

Several studies have found Asian-American males to be the “least desirable” bachelors, a trend that may be exacerbated by a seeming across-the-board preference for dating Asian-American women by men of all races. The term Asian-American, in this case, covers a broad ethnic spectrum, including, but not limited to: “people who have origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East,

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Feminism | Posted by Pippa B on 08/4/2014

The Feminist Case for Home Economics

Home Economics, renamed Family and Consumer Sciences in 1994, had its heyday in the mid-1900s. It was taught in almost all schools and offered as a major in college. Unfortunately, despite being conceived as a way to validate the work that stay-at-home mothers (or homemakers) were doing, it was vilified as a degree in glorified housekeeping and began to disappear towards the turn of the century. Today, while as many as 80% of high school students (including boys and girls) are enrolled in Home Ec. classes, the completion of such classes has declined 38% nationwide.

My mandatory Home Ec. classes served me well. They taught my classmates and me useful skills like how to use a sewing machine, embroider, and cook. They have also drawn more scrutiny than any …

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