Feminism | Posted by Julie Graves on 12/7/2016

My Mom, The Feminist

My mother, the feminist

It was my sophomore year of high school. On the first day of my AP World History class, the teacher progressed down the aisles of rickety desks, asking each student to  say their favorite movie as a “get-to-know-each-other” exercise. “Name and favorite movie,” my teacher requested.

I was sitting in the last seat of the first row of desks, and, as my turn grew closer, I could feel my chest tighten with panic. Normally, I wouldn’t blink before citing my longtime favorite film, Good Will Hunting. I can recite every word along with Matt Damon and Robin Williams. Recently, though, I had fallen in love with Stuck in Love, and spent every night the week before school watching it. In that moment, my mind …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Kayleigh Bolingbroke on 12/5/2016

This New Music Video Powerfully Took On Police Brutality

YG in One Time Comin'

YG in One Time Comin’

In 2012, 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. He was later acquitted of the crime. Two years later, Eric Garner was killed after being placed in a chokehold by police officers, and Michael Brown had been shot to death by a white police officer in Missouri just a month later. Their deaths, along with far too many others, did not represent a new phenomenon, but did awaken a newly powerful, social media-based iteration of a movement for justice: Black Lives Matter.

At least 263 African-Americans in the US died due to police brutality in 2016 alone. The number seems to only grow, and this fact hasn’t gone unnoticed by the media. Over the past two years, Twitter has been …

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Feminism | Posted by Leanne Yuen on 11/28/2016

Fighting Asian American Stereotypes

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It’s time to end the stereotypes once and for all

There’s a common myth that Asian Americans do not experience racism on as grand a level as do other people of color. While many Eastern Asians experience light skin privilege, and violations like police brutality do disproportionately affect African Americans, there is still an urgent need to fight for Asian American rights in this nation, too.

Let’s take the numerous stereotypes that persist about Asian Americans. The most common ones maintain that Asians are fond of rice, proficient in the maths and sciences (and have parents who force them to enter those fields professionally), and prone to being quiet and submissive. How can these stereotypes be offensive or damaging? Many seem to wonder. There’s nothing wrong with liking rice, acing

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Farha K on 11/23/2016

Wifey Material

Wifey.

It has been almost one hundred years since the Women’s Bureau was established in the Department of Labor. The Bureau aimed to promote the welfare of wage-earning women and for their rights to be respected in the workforce. But this progress was simultaneously, continuously threatened by the stereotype of the “good wife.” American men were expected to yearn for (and receive) the retro misogynistic fantasy of coming home to a spotless house, good meal, and an effortlessly beautiful woman.

I once thought that this blatantly sexist expectation of women had long been retired, but a recent pop-culture fad disproved this misconception and reinforced the reality that so many men still expect their wives to cook and clean for them: Namely, the social media-based “wifey” meme.

The “wifey” fad basically …

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Feminism | Posted by Angela Liu on 11/22/2016

Thankful For Planned Parenthood

Thank you, Planned Parenthood

100 years ago, a young woman named Margaret Sanger opened the first-ever birth control clinic in the Brownsville neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. Only ten days later, police raided the clinic and arrested Sanger and her staff. Sanger spent 30 days in jail, where instead of quietly acquiescing, she shared birth control information with other female inmates. After her release, Sanger opened the clinic a second time. Then, a third. Margaret Sanger went on to become the face and spirit of the American reproductive rights movement. She gave lectures across the country, distributed pamphlets, an illegal act at the time, and continued to open brick-and-mortar clinics around the country. Today, there are 650 Planned Parenthood clinics serving communities across America.

Margaret Sanger’s story reads like that …

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Feminism | Posted by Crystal Ogar on 11/21/2016

Redefine Weak

Redefine weak.

I’ve always been an emotional person. It’s something I haven’t been able to help, although at times I may have wanted to. Anger, passion, sensitivity, tears — it all naturally flows through me. I cry easily. And a lot. If I see someone else in pain, I’m angry (anger that’s often invalidated because I’m a black woman). It’s not something I’ve been able to control, although at times I have wanted to.

I grew up aware that being emotional has always been coded as “feminine” and attributed to people who exude so-called “feminine” qualities. This is most often associated with people who identify as women, but is also associated with men — almost always in the context of an insult. Men are not afforded the room to be …

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Feminism | Posted by Anna V. Eskamani on 11/15/2016

Letting Compassion Win

Our President-elect

Dear Mom,

On the eve of Election Day I was restless, unable to sleep. In an effort to find peace I wrote you a letter. Filled with nervous energy, I asked for you to be there with me, to help me stay focused as I rallied UCF students on November 8th to vote for Hillary Clinton so that our nation could do what seemed near impossible: break the glass ceiling and elect the first woman President of the United States.

One week later, I am still processing our defeat. I cry not because we lost, but because of how he won. Donald Trump campaigned on an alt-right agenda, pushed against multiculturalism, used hateful rhetoric, and inspired fear in us all. As a female candidate, Clinton already had a …

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Feminism | Posted by Lauren D on 11/11/2016

The Gender Safety Gap

The Twin Towers

I grew up and currently live in post-9/11 New York City. I don’t remember what the city was like before the attacks. I will never remember a city in which it wasn’t standard to see assault rifles in train stations. My New York has been filled with annual moments of silence to commemorate the loudest sound I’ve ever heard. My New York will always have ads plastered up with the words “See Something, Say Something” to remind its inhabitants of the imminent danger they face every day.  I grew up watching the construction of  Freedom Tower — a reminder that the city could rebound even after an immense tragedy.

I remember that day. Evidence of the tragedy exists in both my mind and in the Lower Manhattan …

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