Feminism | Posted by Helena N on 03/28/2017

What Rihanna Revealed About Humanitarian Work

Rihanna accepting her award

Rihanna accepting her award

On February 28, 2017, Rihanna walked up the creaky wooden steps of one of Cambridge’s storied halls to accept the Harvard Foundation’s 2017 Peter J. Gomes Humanitarian of the Year Award. While she is best known for her music, Rihanna was recognized that day for her less publicized humanitarian work—including her investment in a modernized oncology wing at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in her hometown of Bridgetown, Barbados, and establishing scholarships to support Caribbean students who want to attend college abroad, among other philanthropic efforts.

While accepting the honor, Rihanna made an impassioned plea for more people to become involved in humanitarian work for a simple reason: We should always strive to be in better service of others. While addressing an audience at one of the most …

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Feminism | Posted by Faatimah Solomon on 03/22/2017

AMAZE and the Importance of Sex Education for Tweens

AMAZE

AMAZE

I grew up in a religious and conservative family, in the very religious and conservative country of Saudi Arabia. My parents never talked to me about sex education. At school, the topic of sex was unquestionably taboo and would never come up in discussions about health. I remember trying to piece together what exactly sex entailed when I was in the eighth grade. I had gathered little pieces of information from varying sources: movies, books intended for audiences older and more mature than I was, and of course, my friends. We would sit together on green plastic benches during lunch and put our heads together conspiringly, trying to pool together what we each knew about sex to come to a solid conclusion.

Eventually, thanks to being a voracious reader …

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Feminism | Posted by Osama on 03/20/2017

Being LGBT In The Middle East

Being LGBT in the Middle East

For the most part, I am a normal teenager in Amman, Jordan. I wake up when I hear my alarm and get ready for school. But perhaps unlike other 15-year old-boys, I have never fantasized about beautiful girls in my classes, have never imagined being with them. In fact, the idea of that has always terrified me.

At the age of 10, I became fully aware that something made me different; I was crushing on my male friend while everyone else was dying to get to know girls. I closed my eyes and pretended nothing abnormal had crossed my mind. But the idea of him touching me and feeling my skin was beyond fascinating—one I could never get out of my mind, especially when …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Zeilinger on 03/17/2017

An Interview With Hanne Larsen, The College-Aged Director Of ‘The Sex Myth’

'The Sex Myth'

‘The Sex Myth’

In 2015, feminist journalist Rachel Hills published The Sex Myth: The Gap Between Our Fantasies and Reality—a book that questions the sexual norms and expectations with which younger generations have been raised. In 2016, Northeastern University student Hanne Larsen adapted the book into a work of devised theater. Now Hills and director Dana Edell want to bring Larsen’s theatrical vision of the book to campuses across the country.

Larsen recently talked to the FBomb about her experience as a female director and creative, and why this show is an important part of dispelling the “sex myth.”

Let’s start at the beginning. How did you first find The Sex Myth and what inspired you to adapt it into a show?

I attended Rachel Hills’s workshop “Let’s Talk …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Kadin Burnett on 03/14/2017

The Brilliance Of ‘Get Out’

'Get Out'

‘Get Out’

*Spoiler Alert*: This review contains details about the plot of the movie.

The film Get Out opens on a single shot that, just like the film as a whole, manages to brilliantly capitalize on horror tropes to illuminate the terror of racial stereotypes and racism. Terror in suburbia is a staple of the horror genre—a staple Get Out immediately subverts by opening on  a masked figure stalking an unwitting victim—a black man. The shot is followed immediately by a credits montage set to “Redbone” by Childish Gambino—a song that recounts a sinister and manipulative dishonest relationship and warns the victim to “stay woke,” and in turn foreshadows the relationship at the center of the film. This artful scene is just one of many that prove Get Out to …

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Feminism | Posted by Gabby Catalano on 03/13/2017

Addressing Gendered Online Harassment

Let's take online harassment seriously.

Let’s take online harassment seriously.

Last summer, my friend Katie* received an Instagram message from a man who claimed to know her. When she ignored him, he commented several times on her photos: “hey baby,” “bad girl,” “sexy,” “I knew you were bad,” and “you bitch” were only a few of the degrading messages she received. She blocked him on Instagram, but he then sent her multiple Facebook and Twitter messages. Katie felt so embarrassed, violated, and harassed that she decided to delete all of her social media accounts.

Katie’s experience is, unfortunately, hardly an anomaly; she is just one of the one in six women who will be stalked in her lifetime.  In 2016, 26 percent of young women aged 18-24 were stalked online, and 25 percent were the …

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Feminism | Posted by Ashley Johnson on 03/7/2017

Embracing My Blackness At Predominantly White Institutions

My schools have all been predominately white

I wouldn’t say that I necessarily felt white growing up, but I never felt all that black, either. I wasn’t raised to feel in any way less than my white counterparts, but at the same time, my parents never taught or encouraged me to identify strongly with being black. We never had a history lesson on blackness in my home or any in-depth conversations about Dr. King on his birthday. We weren’t part of a black community: we didn’t go to church regularly and were mostly isolated from our extended family—we never had the Tyler Perry-esque big, jolly reunions I saw black families have on TV and in the movies. Rather, my siblings and I were raised to believe that we were, in …

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Feminism | Posted by Mankaprr Conteh on 03/1/2017

Hands on Their Backs: How Black Girls Are Pushed Out of Schools

Dr. Monique Morris on black girl “pushout”

Dr. Monique Morris made me nervous. She shouldn’t have. She has soft-looking chestnut skin and gorgeous locs. On the day we met, she wore a set of bracelets whimsically stacked on her arm that chimed when she entered the radio station. Later that day, I would watch her sing, smile, and reference west-coast hip-hop as she gave a presentation on school discipline, black girls, and the juvenile justice system — her areas of expertise.

Dr. Morris is beautiful and charming and kind. She’s an advocate and scholar who goes as hard for black girls as I should have when I had the chance. So, when she sits in front of me, ready for me to interview her, I don’t just see her. I …

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