Feminism | Posted by Crystal Ogar on 11/21/2016

Redefine Weak

Redefine weak.

I’ve always been an emotional person. It’s something I haven’t been able to help, although at times I may have wanted to. Anger, passion, sensitivity, tears — it all naturally flows through me. I cry easily. And a lot. If I see someone else in pain, I’m angry (anger that’s often invalidated because I’m a black woman). It’s not something I’ve been able to control, although at times I have wanted to.

I grew up aware that being emotional has always been coded as “feminine” and attributed to people who exude so-called “feminine” qualities. This is most often associated with people who identify as women, but is also associated with men — almost always in the context of an insult. Men are not afforded the room to be …

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Feminism | Posted by Anna V. Eskamani on 11/15/2016

Letting Compassion Win

Our President-elect

Dear Mom,

On the eve of Election Day I was restless, unable to sleep. In an effort to find peace I wrote you a letter. Filled with nervous energy, I asked for you to be there with me, to help me stay focused as I rallied UCF students on November 8th to vote for Hillary Clinton so that our nation could do what seemed near impossible: break the glass ceiling and elect the first woman President of the United States.

One week later, I am still processing our defeat. I cry not because we lost, but because of how he won. Donald Trump campaigned on an alt-right agenda, pushed against multiculturalism, used hateful rhetoric, and inspired fear in us all. As a female candidate, Clinton already had a …

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Feminism | Posted by Lauren D on 11/11/2016

The Gender Safety Gap

The Twin Towers

I grew up and currently live in post-9/11 New York City. I don’t remember what the city was like before the attacks. I will never remember a city in which it wasn’t standard to see assault rifles in train stations. My New York has been filled with annual moments of silence to commemorate the loudest sound I’ve ever heard. My New York will always have ads plastered up with the words “See Something, Say Something” to remind its inhabitants of the imminent danger they face every day.  I grew up watching the construction of  Freedom Tower — a reminder that the city could rebound even after an immense tragedy.

I remember that day. Evidence of the tragedy exists in both my mind and in the Lower Manhattan …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by David Guirgis on 11/10/2016

The Crucial Lessons Solange Teaches In ‘A Seat At The Table’

Credit: YouTube

Credit: YouTube

2016 was Beyoncé’s year. Her album Lemonade is inarguably one of the most profound cultural expressions of black femininity produced this year (and, let’s be honest, ever). Her thought-provoking lyrics and beautiful visual album contributed to a national dialogue on race and racism in this country — a broader dialogue that even influenced the presidential campaign platforms and debates.

But this year could also easily be considered the year of the Knowles family, as September 30 marked the release of A Seat at the Table, Solange Knowles’ third studio album. The album, which had been in the works since 2008, is a 22 track-long magnum opus — a grand, magnificent, and intensely personal statement about being a black woman in America.

I am not a black …

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 11/7/2016

Experiencing Racial Bias In Preschool

It starts early

When I was in preschool I hated my skin. While I had bronze skin, brown eyes, and brown hair, my friends in preschool looked different. Most of them had fair skin, blue eyes, and blond hair. I thought I could remedy this, could look more like them, by walking with my inner arms turned outwards because that skin was paler than the rest of me.

I remember seeing Snow White, a Disney Princess with “white” in her very name, at age 3. Snow white had brown eyes and dark hair like me, but her skin was so much lighter than mine.  Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, and Ariel also had pale skin like Snow White. I remember wishing that I could look more like a princess, and to me …

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Feminism | Posted by Reilly W on 11/4/2016

On Being Catholic and Pro-Choice

Being a pro-choice feminist

Many people might find the two identities I hold closest to be contradictory: I am a Catholic, but am also an ardent, sex-positive, Birkenstock-wearing feminist. But I don’t think these identities contradict each other. I believe that Catholics have a duty to be radically accepting of other people, Catholic or otherwise, and am therefore pro-gay marriage, anti-Islamaphobia, pro-contraception, and perhaps most notably, pro-choice.

Even so, these stances are undoubtedly hard to come to terms with as a Catholic. At some point in their lives, many Catholics feel they don’t personally align with the doctrines taught in Sunday School, like those regarding abortion and beyond. When you’ve been raised in the church, though, it’s somewhat disillusioning to think of yourself as somehow outside it. Beyond unsettling, many …

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Feminism | Posted by Mankaprr Conteh on 11/2/2016

How A Nicki Minaj Concert Was A Little Like The New African American History Museum

National Museum for African-American History and Culture

Two incredibly breathtaking, incredibly black things happened to me a few weeks ago. First, I attended the TidalX1015 concert benefiting the Robin Hood Foundation. Then, I visited the newly inaugurated National Museum for African-American History and Culture (NMAAHC) in Washington, D.C. the very next day.

I had only found out that I would be attending the TidalX1015 concert and visiting the new museum a few days before my trip. A certain, relatively well-known teacher of mine was taking her radically experimental class to New York and DC to presumably learn about educational policy and black history. She invited me, her intern and mentee, to tag along.

But this certain teacher of mine loves a good surprise. She sent us the trip’s itinerary …

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Feminism | Posted by Corinne Singer on 10/31/2016

Witchcraft: Dispelling Myths and Uncovering Radical Truths

Corinne Singer

Photo credit: Corinne Singer

Halloween is the perfect time to reflect on the increasing popularity of witchcraft— or at the very least, the perceived aesthetics of witchcraft that many champion on platforms like Instagram. The rising visibility of witchcraft over the last few decades can also be traced across TV shows like Buffy the Vampire SlayerSabrina the Teenage WitchCharmedWitches of East End, the Vampire Diaries, and more.

Although witchcraft is gaining visibility in popular culture, it is often greatly misrepresented. Before my senior year of high school, I had never known that witchcraft represents both a historical and widespread spiritual practice.

The more I read about the occult, however, the more I realized how the practice coincides with radical feminism. As such, …

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