Feminism | Posted by Saskia G on 01/27/2016

Women in the Military Are Now Allowed to Step Up

Women in the military

On December 3rd, the U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter made a game-changing announcement for women in the military. All active combat roles, he proclaimed, would become open to women. They can now serve as infantry soldiers, Navy SEALS, Green Berets, and other Special Forces operatives in departments previously closed to them. This decision not only countered the military’s reputation as a sexist bastion of conservatism, but will also tangibly benefit women in the military’s careers by allowing them to rise to higher ranks than was previously possible.

Thanks to the Women’s Armed Services Integration Act, women have been allowed to enlist in the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines since 1948 – the same year official racial segregation in the armed forces ended. Women …

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Feminism | Posted by Caitlyn Martin on 01/25/2016

The Facts Every Young Woman Needs To Know About Medication Abortion

Medication abortion is a safe, optimal option for many women.

On Friday, women across the country commemorated the 43rd anniversary of the landmark Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion in the United States. Many noted that despite this legislation, however, abortion remains inaccessible for far too women in this country. A recent medical development, however, has the potential to dramatically empower young women’s to make the best reproductive choice possible — but a lack of information as well as perpetuated misinformation keep women from it.

This development is medication abortion, or the abortion pill, which has become available in the United States just the last 15 years. While more discussions about this pill are now emerging — from the media’s celebration of its 15th anniversary …

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Creative | Posted by Jo E on 01/22/2016

Bisexuality Isn’t Real, My Ass.

Somehow she ended up sitting next to me on the couch as the five of us snuggled. Three of us ended up on the L shaped couch, the other two on the floor. And there she was. Next to me, sitting back after she had gotten the movie—“The Shining”—set up on her TV.

It didn’t take long for me to forget about my discomfort and focus on the movie, which was good, and not so scary that I couldn’t watch. But then she grabbed my arm and pulled it around her, lying her body back against my chest, and I could smell how nice she smelled — she was obsessed with nice-smelling lotions and hair sprays. I tried not to let her feel the tension that she inspired in my …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Aph Ko on 01/20/2016

5 Tips For New Feminist Bloggers of Color

The case for feminist blogging.

I became a feminist at 16 years old. At the time, the word “feminist” wasn’t nearly as popular as it is today. In fact, I vividly remember trying to explain sexism and gender inequality to my high school friends outside of movie theaters and coffee shops — to blank stares.

When I was 17, I read Angela Davis’ auto-biography (as well as Women, Race, and Class) and felt my life and feminist identity evolve: I was provided with language for the pain I was feeling as a woman of color in a white supremacist patriarchy. I had an old typewriter which I used to write “articles” about my thoughts on society and power (although I would probably cringe if I were to read them …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Chloe H on 01/15/2016

How Young, Female Photographers Are Carrying On A Powerful Legacy

There’s a strong legacy of female photographers.

The Musée de l’Orangerie is a renowned art gallery in Paris, France. Although it’s best known for housing Monet’s “Water Lilies,” the gallery is currently featuring an exhibit entitled “Who’s Afraid of Women Photographers? 1839-1919.” I was fortunate enough to see the exhibit, which includes the work of 75 female photographers — some famous, some unknown. The featured artists managed to overcome the sexist expectations and prejudices that were part and parcel of the era in which they worked and laid the groundwork for an industry in which female artists have continued to thrive.

Although relatively little attention has been paid to their work, many women have thrived as photographers over the past century. While many women discovered the art form …

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Feminism | Posted by Saskia G on 01/13/2016

What Does Voting Really Mean? A Look At Saudi Arabian Women’s First Election

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Saudi Arabian women voters

Saudi Arabia is known for limiting women’s rights. Women who live in the conservative Islamic nation must wear an abaya, a full-length black cloak covering their hair and body, and an additional scarf over the face is optional but recommended. Women cannot travel, marry, or attend university without permission from male family members. As protests recently revealed, many Saudi Arabian women also still cannot drive, despite a tentative new policy meant to enforce the right.

But as of 2015, they can vote. What’s more, they can run for office.

Saudi Arabia is one of the last nations in the world to grant women suffrage. Although the nation held its first election since 1964 just a decade ago in 2005, according to BBC, women were not …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 01/8/2016

How The #ChoreChallenge Is Pushing Back On The Sexist ‘Double Shift’

#ChoreChallenge 2016

In 1989, sociologist Arlie Hochschild noticed a pervasive, but rarely acknowledged, form of everyday sexism happening around her. While women had made great strides in terms of entering the workforce, they were still expected to do the majority of domestic work traditionally expected of women in addition to their professional work — a phenomenon she deemed “the Second Shift.”

Although Hochschild wrote the book decades ago, this “second shift” persists today. A 2014 Bureau of Labor Statistics report showed that on a typical day, nearly half of women employed outside the home do housework while only 19% of men do. As Laura Bates, one of the co-organizers of the challenge, noted in the Guardian, a recent BBC survey found that women spend twice as much time on …

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Feminism | Posted by David G on 01/6/2016

What The Reaction To Sandra Bland’s Case Reveals About White Feminism

#SayHerName

#SayHerName

Sandra Bland, an African-American woman arrested for failing to use her turn signal, was found dead in her jail cell three days after her arrest in July. On Wednesday, December 23, a Texas grand jury presiding over the case decided not to indict anyone in relation to Bland’s death and protesters — who had previously called for justice in this case — began anew.

Yet a seemingly important group that should presumably also oppose this injustice has seemed to remain quiet: mainstream feminist groups. While activists associated with groups like #BlackLivesMatter have lined the streets, groups focused on gender equality seem to view the issue of police brutality as one related to race and therefore irrelevant. The choice to do so is not just problematic in relation to Sandra …

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