Creative | Posted by Vicki S on 09/19/2016

Meet The Teen Artist Tackling Everyday Sexism In Her Work

19-year-old Röra Blue first caught the Internet’s attention with her jarringly honest photo series, “The Unsent Project.” The project, which has already accumulated thousands of submissions, is a collection of unsent text messages to first loves. First launched on Tumblr, users can now submit their unsent texts directly through Röra’s website: They can choose the color of their message, type their unspoken words to first significant others, and can then print them into stickers.

The Unsent Project:

The Unsent Project:

Recently, Röra has focused her attention on a new, more feminist-minded project: “Handle With Care.

According to Röra’s website, “Handle With Care” seeks to capture sexist comments — literally. Her photos asks viewers to pay attention to sexism by forcing them to engage with and critique many …

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Feminism | Posted by Vicki S on 07/12/2016

On The Ground: Interviews With Young Feminist Activists

Corinne Singer

Corinne Singer

Welcome to “On the Ground,” a new interview series that highlights the work young feminist activists are doing in their own communities.

“Before my sophomore year at Andover, I didn’t even know what the term ‘feminism’ meant,” feminist activist and Barnard College student Corinne Singer told me. “Although I grew up in feminist-structured house where my dad is a full-time caregiver and my mom is a full-time ‘breadwinner,’ we didn’t talk about gender in my house as a system of power.

But during Corinne’s sophomore year at her high school, Phillips Academy Andover, a group of 12 or so seniors started a movement on campus called F=E, Feminism Equals Equality. The group hosted forums, started a Facebook page that provided a space for people to post things …

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Feminism | Posted by Kinder L on 12/7/2015

Why We Still Need To Talk About Periods, Period.

Rupi Kaur:

Rupi Kaur:

I recently attended a feminist art show that included an abstract painting on a stretched canvas made entirely of the artist’s period blood. The show featured many works condemning body shaming and promoting self-love — including nude photographs, painted portraits and performance pieces — but this one clearly stood out. Thanks to many headlines promoted on social media in recent months, I had heard of other artists who incorporated menstruation into their work (like the infamous vaginal knitter) but seeing such a work in person was a completely different experience and one that inspired me to reflect on how the perception of periods have changed over time. Or, more accurately, I realized they haven’t: We still have a long way to go break down period stigma …

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Creative | Posted by Sabrina N on 09/25/2015

An Interview with Photographer Ashley Armitage

21-year-old Seattle-based photographer and filmmaker Ashley Armitage’s work is largely a tribute to female friendships and femininity. Her dreamy, nuanced photography lets viewers into the intimate, magical moments of girlhood. They depict beauty routines and sleepovers. They unabashedly celebrate and normalize body hair, tampons and bras. The collection is a celebration of girlhood by one of its own products. Its creation is an especially empowering and important act in a society that attempts to ascribe exactly what young girls should and shouldn’t be.

Armitage’s work is brave, beautiful, unapologetic and startlingly honest — much like Armitage herself. I sat down with her to discuss her vision, her future, and what it’s like to grow up.

So obviously, you love photography. When did you start getting into it, and why

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Feminism | Posted by Cheyenne T on 04/15/2015

Meet The Teens Using Intersectional Art As Feminist Activism



First I found myself through art. Then I found myself through feminism. Finally, I found myself through activism. I was confused but ambitious in high school and passionately tried to learn everything I could about the world. Even though I realized that my peers were also developing their own senses of self, I still desperately wanted to understand who I was, to feel comfortable with myself and understand my place in the world.

Art was my escape because it didn’t require me to stay inside my body. I could be anyone and present anything to the world.  It wasn’t necessarily me, but some creation of my own. I was frustrated by the person I was told I needed to be in order to be successful and taken seriously …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Darializa Avila-Chevalier on 04/24/2014

Choosing Not to Support Marginalization of Minority Groups Through Illustration

Illustration by Darializa Avila-Chevalier

As an artist for my college’s newspaper, the Columbia Spectator, I sometimes have to illustrate pieces laced with unrecognized privilege. I’ve drawn for articles that fetishize poverty in Spanish Harlem and pieces that depict the “Columbia experience” as entirely universal to its student body. I’ve also illustrated for authors who have complained that “their privilege excludes them from conversation.” As a result, I, a low-income, Afro-Latina, first-generation American woman, feel alienated in my own community. This is not to say that Spec’s contributors aim to drown out the voices of the marginalized—I believe most have good intentions and hope to create a forum of expression safe for all identities. But intention is irrelevant when people of marginalized identities feel the ever-present divide reinforced.

I love …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Ruth L on 02/20/2013

Judy Chicago at the Ben Uri Gallery

Judy Chicago, posing with her famous installation "The Dinner Party"

Judy Chicago is one of my favourite artists. So, when I heard she was exhibiting in London for the first time since the 80s, well, I was rather excited. The Ben Uri Gallery in London seemed like the perfect place for her return to the country, having 1300 works in their permanent collection by women artists. Many of these works are currently focusing on themes such as autobiography, erotica, feminism, the nude and issues of masculine power.

Which is precisely what Chicago is most well known for. During the 1970s, she founded the first feminist art program in America, aiming to incorporate these themes into the realm of art. This was a time when the personal was truly political and …

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Feminism | Posted by Katherine C on 07/27/2011

A Feminist Image In The Eye Of The Beholder

"Beyond Betty"

"Beyond Betty"

I don’t remember how I set out to do this painting. What I do know is that it was the first non-commissioned artwork I’ve sold, and that is was my first explicitly feminist-based painting that got any attention.

Beyond Betty, named after Betty Freidan, author of the second-wave feminist classic The Feminine Mystique, was exhibied twice at a local retirement community gallery- once as part of a group show for high school seniors, and once as part of my International Baccalaureate candidate show. In the small town where I live, people who had seen it came up to me in the street and, even more frequently, at church. “What were you trying to say?” “Is it making fun of Christianity?” “Is it about eating disorders?” “Is it …

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