A Little F'd Up, Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 05/21/2012

A Conversation with Young Author Alex Schnee

When I heard about Alex Schnee, an author and student at Sarah Lawrence college, and her recently published novel, Shakespeare’s Lady, I knew that I had to talk with her. We decided to Skype about both publishing books around the same time, what our experiences were like and why some view young women our age as complacent.

Julie Zeilinger: Ok, so can you just start by explaining briefly what your book is about?

Alex Schnee: Sure. It’s about the “dark lady” of Shakespeare’s sonnets. Nobody really knows who she is, but I found a woman living at that time who has been propositioned as the dark lady by several scholars. I tried to weave together a fictional romance between William Shakespeare and this woman, Emilia Bassano …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 05/15/2012

Writing “A Little F’d Up: Why Feminism Is Not A Dirty Word”

On May 15th, my first book will be published. This fact is not a result of some pretentious belief that at 19, my writing skills have been so carefully honed to the point that my work must be shared with the world. It was not some ploy to get into college. Contrarily, writing this book was the most difficult thing I’ve ever done, and something I almost didn’t do. But it was also an experience that completely transformed me, and for which I will forever be thankful.

After a year of running the FBomb, I was approached to write a book about the next generation of feminism. I tried to explain that the FBomb was always meant to be a community – a place I may have started, but a …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Becka W on 02/27/2012

Why I Seriously Dig Katniss Everdeen

WARNING: Spoilers for the entire Hunger Games series ahead!

For months, three of my friends were begging me to get into the Hunger Games. “You’ll LOVE Katniss,” they all told me. “She’s such a strong female character.”

I was skeptical. Quite a few of my friends think that just because a girl has a voice and a brain in a book or film that it makes her strong. Not that it’s their fault – they’re given slim pickings to choose from (I mean come on, Bella in Twilight? Daisy in The Great Gatsby? Every romantic comedy heroine ever?)

I instantly loved Katniss. She provides for her family by hunting with her best friend, Gale, breaking quite a few rules instated by the Capitol, the over-bearing government/big-brother government in post-apocalyptic North …

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Feminism | Posted by Angela G on 10/17/2011

FBomb Review: “Girls Like Us”

New book from Rachel Lloyd, “Girls Like Us”, is more than a memoir—it’s a life-changing experience. Lloyd, Founder/Executive Director of Girls Education and Mentoring Network (GEMS), tells the story of the commercial sexual exploitation of children in the United States. She does this by weaving her story in with the stories of people whose lives she has touched, and the genesis of GEMS itself. But the stories alone are not what made this book the best one I have read in a long while—it’s how effortlessly they get to the heart of what choice really means. In short, “Girls Like Us” is where theory and practice, activism and ideology, all sing in perfect harmony.

As a feminist, I feel that the concept of “choice” is an ideological cornerstone. That’s …

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Feminism | Posted by Angela G on 09/2/2011

“I’ll Show You Mine”: Exposing the Illusion of Normal

As I cracked open the pink cover of “I’ll Show You Mine” and pulled back the beautiful, full-color pages, my mind rushed back to five years ago. I was in a tiny feminist sex boutique halfway up a Manhattan high rise. It was in that shop’s book section that I first saw (and subsequently purchased) 1980’s classic “A New View Of A Woman’s Body”. Right in the middle of the book, there they were: real vaginas. Real vulvas. Real cervixes. At the time, I had no clue shops like this existed, let alone books like this. Seeing a stranger’s body in all of its reality shocked me, fascinated me, and eventually sparked a transformation of my understanding of what is “real” and what is “normal”. “I’ll Show You Mine” offers …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 06/14/2011

#YASaves

I have been an avid fan of Young Adult fiction since the third grade. I vividly remember standing in the library check out line with the rest of my class during “Library Time” eagerly digging into my Judy Blume while my classmates palmed their Judy Moody books. I think that moment can also be pointed to as the precursor to my reading Anna Karenina in eighth grade when my classmates were reading…well, they weren’t reading. But that’s a self-indulgent admittedly pretentious digression.

I think it’s this deeply ingrained love of YA that caused the low grade rage I felt when reading the recent Wall Street Journal article by Meghan Cox Gurdon. It’s worth reading (in that it’s a piece of crap but will make the rest of this post …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Becka W on 05/24/2011

Bossypants: Why We Should All Bask In The Wisdom Of Tina Fey

Tina Fey is awesome. This is not new information. She’s hilarious, successful, and still dedicated to her family. Fey seems genuine and grounded, which is always nice to see in famous people, who I typically imagine snapping for servants on a beach in Cabo, drinking some sort of pink-colored beverage. I read her memoir (of life so far), Bossypants, like, as Mindy Kaling said, “a grown woman’s Twilight” – before I knew it, it was 5 AM, I was giggling to myself surrounded by Diet Coke cans, and my roommate had her pillow over her face, attempting to block out the light from my lamp.

Aside from being insomnia-inducing, Bossypants has some awesome nuggets of genius-wisdom about growing up, womanhood, feminism, motherhood, and women in the workplace without feeling preachy …

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Feminism | Posted by Krystie Y on 04/22/2011

Books, Women and Happiness

Good books, like good friends, are few and chosen; the more select, the more enjoyable.” -Louisa May Alcott

I was born with a book in my hand. Okay, not really. But I’ve been reading for as long as I can remember, and then some. I used to read a couple of books per week, but in the year 2010 (a crazy one for me) I was lucky if finished one book every few months. Now, I know there’s no such thing as “normal” and “regular,” but this definitely wasn’t my normal. As someone who was once wealthy in book knowledge, I was seriously lacking in the literature department.

Louisa May Alcott was a brilliant writer and an extremely progressive woman for her time. I’ve always admired her, which …

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