Pop-Culture | Posted by Colleen Giles on 06/11/2014

Obvious Child Was Obviously Awesome

Last week, I was able to score some passes to a screening of Obvious Child from Feministing.com. Just the idea of a romantic comedy about abortion made my feminist mind little-kid-giddy. Obvious Child was everything that society needs it to be: funny and important. This film changes the narrative about abortion so often portrayed in television and films, including plots in which abortions are depressing, dark and complicated. Obvious Child instead portrays a very relatable array of characters who navigate the circumstances around a pending abortion.

The main character, Donna Stern, is a comedian and bookstore saleswoman who is in the midst of dealing with a heart breaking betrayal involving her friend and now ex-boyfriend. In an effort to foster her emotional resiliency and enjoy herself, Stern has sex with …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Liz P on 05/11/2011

Bridesmaids: Not Your Average Wedding Movie

Kristen Wiig is at it again

Kristen Wiig is at it again

One of the benefits of going to a college at large, urban campus is that we fairly often get cool free previews of things. My freshman year I went to a free advanced screening of Role Models (hilarious) and last year I went to a one for She’s Out of my League (waste of time). And I recently got to see Bridesmaids! Since it doesn’t come out until Friday (May 13), this was pretty exciting.

I was su-huper excited to see Bridesmaids; I do usually enjoy Judd Apatow movies and all the lead actresses are some of my faves. And honestly I was interested in seeing how the Judd Apatow formula would work with an all-female cast. I mean, this is the director/producer …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Jackie S on 09/16/2010

Women in Pre-Code Film

the divorcee: a great example of an empowered woman in pre-code film

the divorcee: a great example of an empowered woman in pre-code film

Pre-production code films were made from 1929-1934. They were interesting, because they explored subjects that would be relevant in today’s society. They had themes of violence, drug abuse, and sexuality. The thing that was so “naughty” about these films was that most of the sexual encounters were controlled by women. The actresses in these movies gave strong performances as intelligent, independent, and, yes, sexual people. The roles were such departures from the housewife/stereotypical characters women usually played in classic cinema.

There were some great actresses in pre-code films. There was Norma Shearer, Greta Garbo, and Barbara Stanwyck. Actresses got to personify the promiscuity of the typical “male stereotype,” and turn it into many complex characters …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 09/11/2010

Saturday Vids: The Bechdel Test

Here on the FBomb we talk a lot about pop-culture, including women and movies. The Bechdel Test addresses this very topic and is something every good teenage feminist should be informed about. Once you're aware of the test - and actually use it to analyze films - it's CRAZY how many movies are male-centric. Watch, learn and support women-centric films!

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 06/6/2010

Support Women Artists Sunday: Helena Bonham Carter

Helena Bonham Carter

Helena Bonham Carter

Helena Bonham Carter, daughter of Raymond Bonham Carter, a merchant banker, and Elena Bonham Carter (née Propper de Callejón), a psychotherapist, was born in Golders Green, London, England on May 26, 1966 and is the youngest of three children. She is the great-granddaughter of former Prime Minister Herbert H. Asquith and her blue-blooded family tree also contains Barons and Baronesses, diplomats, and a director.

After experiencing family dramas that included her father’s stroke-which left him wheelchair-bound-and attending South Hampstead High School and Westminster School in London, Bonham Carter devoted herself to an acting career. That trajectory actually began in 1979 when, at age 13, she entered a national poetry writing competition and used her second place winnings to place her photo in the casting directory “Spotlight.” She

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 05/26/2010

All The Way

Therese Shechter, the awesome documentarian who brought us I Was A Teenage Feminist, is it again, and this time she's tackling virginity with "How to Lose Your Virginity":

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 04/25/2010

Support Women Artists Sunday: Ellen Page

Ellen Page

Ellen Page

A lot of people may criticize Juno, saying that it’s an unrealistic portrayal of teen pregnancy (and these are valid claims) – but it’s hard to deny how awesome Ellen Page was in that movie. She’s funny, clearly smart and a very talented actress and she definitely deserves some FBomb love.

Born Ellen Philpotts-Page on February 21, 1987 in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The daughter of a teacher and a graphic designer, Ellen Page took an interest in theater from a young age. She performed in her first local production in the fifth grade and won Canada’s prestigious Gemini nomination for her role in the made-for-TV movie Pit Pony in 1997. The busy actress went on to appear in several Canadian television series, including the Pit Pony spin-off,

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