Pop-Culture | Posted by Saskia G on 09/18/2015

Girlpool: The Feminist Band You Need To Know

YouTube: https://youtu.be/VNM8Tg9pvDU


The musical duo Harmony Trividad and Cleo Tucker, also known as “Girlpool,” have a lot to say about the rigid expectations girls face growing up in America. Through unsettling harmonies and raw, creaking voices — accompanied only by a bass and guitar — they send a clear message: They’re fed up.

The duo’s first EP, which was released in November of 2014 with Wichita Records, tackles issues of gender and sexuality from a variety of angles and in a bare, untrained tone allows the listener to really hear what they’re saying. The song “American Beauty,” for example, examines the imperfect but liberating experience of discovering one’s sexuality, and affirms girls’ sexual desires. “Jane” empowers girls to speak up and seek genuine, fulfilling relationships: The last line, “If you are

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Fiona L on 08/11/2014

Jenny Lewis’ The Voyager Is a Feminist Experience

“I’m just another lady without a baby.”

Jenny Lewis’ delivery of this line in “Just One of the Guys,” the third song on her new album, The Voyager, is quiet, yet powerful. She seems almost to be taunting the listener, or possibly to be imitating someone she once heard describe her. In the video for the song, Lewis’ face is serious as she leads up to this sentence, and the camera zooms in on her face. But, the minute she begins to utter the phrase, her lips widen into a smile–an inside joke with herself, perhaps–and she begins to dance.

The Voyager has been making waves since its release on July 29. It’s Lewis’ first solo project in 8 years, and most reviews are overwhelmingly positive. Jeff Himmelman at …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 02/9/2014

Support Women Artists Sunday: London Grammar

English trio London Grammar combined sparse electronic pop in the model of the xx with dramatic, big-voiced lead singer Hannah Reid, whose vocals evoke contemporaries Florence Welch and Natasha Khan of Bat for Lashes. Reid and guitarist Dan Rothman met in the dorms of Nottingham University where they began writing music together in 2009 and later added multi-instrumentalist Dot Major to complete the lineup. The following years saw them refine their sound with atmospheric electronics and subtle percussion, and they often played to rooms of no more than ten people. Their popularity rose with the 2012 release of “Hey Now,” which they uploaded to the internet and instantly found an online cult following. Their fans were not just in the U.K., but also on the other side of the world …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 01/26/2014

Support Women Artists Sunday: Caitlin Rose

Caitlin Rose

Caitlin Rose’s inspirations, from Gram Parsons to Bonnie Raitt to Linda Ronstadt, belied her late-‘80s birth. The offbeat Nashville, Tennessee-based singer/songwriter and guitarist debuted in February 2008 on the Theory 8 label with the Dead Flowers EP, its title track a Rolling Stones cover with a pleading touch, laced with pedal steel guitar. Five months later, the limited Gorilla Man, pressed on 300 copies of 7” vinyl, featured re-recordings. Her debut album, Own Side Now, followed in August 2010. It was issued on Names, the label that had issued Dead Flowers in the U.K., and reissued in 2011 following her decision to sign with ATO. The assured and impressive The Stand-In appeared early in 2013.

via All Music


Own Side

Caitlin Rose on iTunes

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 01/19/2014

Support Women Artists Sunday: Betty Who

Betty Who

Australian-born pop singer Betty Who makes vivacious yet bittersweet music that calls to mind divas such as Whitney Houston, Robyn, and Katy Perry. Born Jessica Anne Newham in Sydney, she began playing cello, piano, and guitar as a child, and moved to America with her parents when she was a teenager to attend the Interlochen Center for the Arts performing arts school. She then went to the Berklee College of Music for more training as a cellist, but really wanted to focus on being a singer/songwriter (she began performing her own songs at age 16). While at Berklee, she met producer Peter Thomas, and the pair began writing and recording material together. Drawing inspiration from the songwriting skills of Joni Mitchell and Carole King and the epic synth

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 01/5/2014

Support Women Artists Sunday: Beatrice Eli

Beatrice Eli

Beatrice was born in 1987 and received much of her musical upbringing via MTV and the American soul / R & B / hip-hop videos that channel served. Alongside the influential music channel she grew up with Nina Simone and Stevie Wonder, two artists that are constantly played on the stereo at home. She characterizes the music she plays as the soul she loved as a kid meets hip hop. At this year’s Way Out West, she performed at one of Gothenburg’s clubs and her dream is to go around the world and sing for a large and enthusiastic audiences.

via Last.Fm

Violent Silence

The Conqueror

Beatrice Eli on iTunes.

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 11/10/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Pearl and the Beard

Pearl and the Beard

Pearl and the Beard is three voices, one cello, one guitar, one glockenspiel, one melodica, several drums, one accordion, ninety-six teeth, and one soul.

Former strangers Jocelyn Mackenzie, Emily Hope Price, and Jeremy Styles were united in the great city of New York. Each had migrated there from a far corner of the nation with naught but food in their pockets and money in their bellies. Each had the same true love. Since then, the three have nested, and their unique brand of brightly melodic songcraft continues to blossom of its own accord.

The band’s genre-bending and expectation-defying sound has since burst the trio out of the confines of the New York music scene, allowing them to traipse the United States on a multitude of national

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Anya J on 09/11/2013

Mary Lambert’s “She Keeps Me Warm” Does Queer Representation Right

Mary Lambert

You might have heard of Mary Lambert, or maybe not. You’ve probably heard her—she is the woman’s voice in the chorus of Macklemore’s song “Same Love.” I have a lot of complicated feelings about “Same Love.” Although I think the song’s message in favor of same-sex marriage is important, the line “if I were gay I would think hip-hop hates me” is downright false, since hip-hop is a genre with as rich a history of LGBTQ artists as any other. I also sometimes feel like Macklemore uses his privilege as a straight white man to speak over LGBTQ people instead of supporting their voices.

Luckily, Mary Lambert’s beautiful new solo song, for which she’s just released possibly the world’s most adorable video, “She Keeps Me Warm,” …

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