Pop-Culture | Posted by Ally B and Emma M on 10/2/2013

A Response to “The 100 Things Every 20-Something Needs to Realize”

When we noticed the article “The 100 Things Every 20-Something Needs to Realize” being posted and reposted on Facebook last week by some of our favorite ladies, we thought we’d give it a look. We hoped we’d find an article riddled with inspirational truths for us 20-somethings at a time in our lives where we could all use a little advice– whether about our future career paths, falling in love, or just growing up in general.

We were disappointed to find, however, that what Paul Hudson had in mind when writing this article was less inspiration and more provocation.

Although some of the pieces of “advice” on his 100-point list were valid–his assertion of Facebook as a waste of time and his recommendation to start using your alarm clock, for …

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Feminism | Posted by Talia on 09/4/2013

“I’m Not A Boy.”

Every Shabbat (Sabbath), I volunteer at the kids’ group at my shul (synagogue). After we finish the service, Shabbat lunch is served. Traditionally, kiddush is made over wine or grape juice before the meal begins. The rebbetzin (rabbi’s wife) who runs the group at my shul always has a kid make the kiddush. Although this brakha (blessing) is traditionally reserved for the patriarch of the family, the rebbetzin allows both boys and girls to say kiddush.

During the summertime, the number of participants at the group tends to dwindle. A few weeks ago, when there was a particularly small turnout, the rebbetzin was hard-pressed to find a kid willing to make kiddush. She approached her two younger grandsons, neither of whom wanted to say kiddush. She

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Feminism | Posted by Bridget C. on 08/12/2013

Southern Belle or Southern Hell?

Charlotte La Bouff of "The Princess and the Frog"

Growing up, I always had the benefit of playing sports and hanging out with boys. It was great until around seventh grade. Then girls and boys separated. We didn’t play sports together during recess, PE was divided by gender, and we didn’t even sit together at lunch most days. The worst part was the teachers. Every time I dared to sit without my legs glued shut, ate quickly, or made a crude joke, I was quickly reminded to “act like a lady.” I went from a tomboy to a dainty, “ewh dirt!” exclaiming, knee-length skirt wearing teenager within a year. I hated myself for two years trying to become the lady that my community desired.

This was to be expected though. …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 08/2/2013

6 Reasons “The To Do List” Is Great For Women

Aubrey Plaza and Rachel Bilson in "The To Do List"

As a movie lover, I’m used to being frustrated, insulted and bored with female characters. Truly, there are few things quite as annoying as being asked to ignore everything I know and believe to be true about women for two hours, as most movies ask me to do. Then a breath of fresh air in a sea of films featuring damsels in distress, and women who exist solely for the gratification of immature guys appeared on Friday night. It’s more formally being referred to as “The To Do List.”

This indie film centers around the story of Brandy Clark (played by Aubrey Plaza), a multidimensional female protagonist whose on-screen journey to sexual self-discovery revolves around her growth as …

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Feminism | Posted by Alison L on 07/17/2013

The Job You Never Realized You Had

One time the engineering class at my all-girls high school (yes, my school was that awesome) went to a near-by all-boys school to hear a speaker give a presentation about entrepreneurship, financial independence and math/STEM related topics. At one point during the presentation he asked for the students who had jobs or work experience to raise their hands.

Almost all of the boys raised their hands… and almost none of the girls did.

It was a little jarring. Were girls lazier than boys? If we lacked job experience—what else did we lack? Is studying not enough? Is this why men have more opportunities and potentially better careers than women?

Before my thoughts spiraled into a full-fledged feminist identity crisis, my teacher turned to my classmates and shout-whispered to us, “Girls! …

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Feminism | Posted by Eve Rebil on 07/5/2013

Your Body Is Too Distracting: School Dress Codes and Slut Shaming

I’ve always hated the idea of dress codes. As a teen, I felt like it was an assault on my personal freedom. Unlike the rebellious stereotype however, I wore as many layers as I could. I frequently wore my father’s XL fleece jacket to school, even though it hung about my knees. It took me years to understand why I felt the need to bury myself in so much clothing, and just as much time to wear anything fitted. Growing up with a positive body image is hard enough these days, but doing so in a school environment where slut-shaming was not only condoned, but perpetrated by school administrators and parents is nearly impossible.

I am not alone with my experience. Lately, this issue has cropped up on the Huffington

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Feminism | Posted by Hannah H on 06/14/2013

Tomboy Exceptionalism: “I’m Not Like The Other Girls”

I grew up a tomboy. That meant no dresses, no dolls, and even biting my kindergarten boyfriend who dared to give me a party favour bag at his birthday that was princess themed. It meant playing in the mud, wearing clothes from the boy’s section at Old Navy, and (most importantly) being tough, rough, and powerful. I wasn’t “like the other girls” — I wanted the boys to value and play with me, rather than try and look up my skirt when I jumped from the monkey bars as they did with my friend Lauren.

So I got to play in their reindeer games because, as a tomboy, I was free from gender expectations that devalued me as a women. I wasn’t a threat because I wasn’t “ like the …

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Feminism | Posted by Charles Clymer on 05/8/2013

A Letter To My Future Son

A friend of mine has a young son. She recently asked me, and other men, to write a letter to our sons who exist or have yet to be born that she could show to her own child, someday. This is my letter.

Dear Son,

If you’re reading this, you are now set to embark on a journey into that wonderful, stressful, often-sticky phase we call “young adulthood”.

I want you to know that my love for you, my personal stake in your existence, could never be adequately measured.

As you have grown over the last 18 years, all I have ever sought to do is give you the best possible start on happiness in life and to respect and love others as equals.

You are a man in our …

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