Articles | Posted by Martine K on 10/13/2014

Ileana Jiménez: Inspiring Feminism Locally and Globally

Ileana Jimenez

Social media as well as blogs and communities like the FBomb have played a key role for young people involved in the feminist movement by giving us a platform to share our thoughts and ideas and allowing us to learn about and discover feminism by scrolling through our social media newsfeeds or browsing the blogosphere. This phenomenon is also becoming more prevalent every day (according to Facebook, #feminism is trending).

However, I came to the movement through a high school feminism class taught by Ileana Jiménez called “Fierce and Fabulous Feminism”. This class has become a rite of passage for many of my peers and me and is the only class I’ve ever taken in which the students agree not only that the class should be two hours

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Feminism | Posted by Dessi E on 09/26/2014

On Being Formerly Afraid of Feminism

I used to be scared I would be “brainwashed” into being a feminist. I never believed the stereotype that feminists are all lesbians who meet in dark places to discuss the abomination that is the male gender and their evil plots to eradicate them. But I always sensed there was a stigma surrounding the movement and feared wasting energy “getting angry about women’s rights” because I thought it would be “time-consuming.” I thought becoming a feminist would require me to shout my opinion every single second of the day and join rallies and form petitions.

But then I discovered feminism on Tumblr. Soon after, I watched the documentary Miss Representation and knew as soon as I clicked “play” that it would change everything. I watched with great interest and, when …

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Feminism | Posted by Ines R on 09/5/2014

On Young Women Traveling Alone

Lima, Peru: more than a stereotype

“Be careful, you’re just a girl!” I heard this phrase far too many times this summer as I prepared to leave for Brazil and Peru. Every Spring Break since I can remember I’ve traveled to Peru, and I’m unfortunately used to people’s stereotypical and prejudiced conceptions of Peruvian culture: I’m pretty sure many of my childhood friends thought that I rode llamas, wore tribal clothing and climbed mountains for the duration of my visits. But this summer, I couldn’t tell if people were skeptical because I was traveling alone as a woman, or if they were just scared of Latin America in general since they saw it as too exotic and dangerous. Regardless, because I am both a woman and Latin American it was …

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Feminism | Posted by Vicki S on 08/18/2014

Why I Need Feminism: Overcoming My Self-Loathing

As a kid I was very chubby and sturdy, but that all changed once puberty kicked in. People wondered if I went on a diet to lose weight when I was younger, but my eating habits hadn’t changed. This complacency didn’t last for very long, though. As I entered high school, I realized that I began to look at my body a lot and focus on my weight more than before. These percolating thoughts soon impregnated themselves deep into views on my body and self-esteem.

In October, I was already considered thin for my 5’5″ frame, but by the end of December, I made it my New Years’ resolution to lose 10lbs. In my head, I was just going to cut down on what I ate. Of course, this easily …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Ines R on 08/15/2014

Stop Tweeting That and Start Living It

It is almost impossible to deny that millennials are obsessed with documenting everything. We think that something funny we see at Target, or a friend’s drunken rant at a party, or just a quick selfie must be shared with the world. Can you prove you were really within arm’s reach of Beyonce if you didn’t take a picture? It’s everywhere, from screenshots to Snapchats, one could see it as sharing joy or laughter with others. But in all sincerity, most Facebook posts or Snapchat stories are just a way to say, “Look at all the amazing and fun things I do, I am cool, and don’t you just wish you were me?”

I don’t say this in a patronizing way. Look at my camera roll and there are thousands of …

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Feminism | Posted by Annemarie McDaniel on 08/6/2014

Why The Sexism at Texas Boys State 2014 Is Not Okay

Texas Boys State

What do astronaut Neil Armstrong, President Bill Clinton, basketball star Michael Jordan, and singer Bon Jovi all have in common? When they were juniors in high school, they all attended a prestigious but little-known program called Boys State. That’s just the beginning of the incredibly long list of famous Boys State alumni, and alumnae from its sister program, Girls State, are just as impressive.

In just a few days at the summer Boys State and Girls State program, high school students run for office, write legislation, draft court opinions, publish newspapers, and more. Usually this is a very fulfilling experience, but this year, at Texas’ Boys State, one delegate’s entire campaign speech was just the words “Cold beer and titties.” Campaign photos featured swimsuit models with …

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Feminism | Posted by Paris A on 07/14/2014

Why We Need Women’s Studies Classes in High School

My high school feminism class holding their “Who Needs Feminism” signs (photo credit: Noel Diggs).

For years I, like most of my peers, always struggled to answer the question “why do we still need feminism?” But ever since I took a class about feminism my Junior year of high school, I can’t and won’t go back to my previous ignorance about the movement. Now, because of that class, I can readily give a general but accurate answer: I need feminism because I cannot live without it.

This feminism class led me to reflect a lot on what it means to be a teenage girl in this world. Ever since I was practically shoved chest-first into puberty, I have felt the effects of the way women and girls are sexualized and …

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Feminism | Posted by Angela B on 06/27/2014

How I Lost My Voice

My single-sex elementary school class

I went to a weird elementary school. It was a hybrid between co-educational and single sex classrooms. The idea was that as children grow older, the differences between the ways boys and girls learned beomce more distinct: kindergartners and first graders had co-ed classes, but from second grade to 8th grade, the classes were split into single sex classrooms. At seven and eight this never seemed strange to me, and I assumed all schools followed this model, until at soccer practice a girl on my team was telling a story about how a boy in her class was trying to convince everyone that Spiderman was the best superhero. I asked her what a boy was doing in her classroom, earning laughter from my teammates …

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