Feminism | Posted by Virginia Jiang on 01/20/2017

Why I March

Are you going to March?

Are you going to March?

I remember the first time I was called a fag.

It was on a crisp fall day. I was walking to class. A man passed by me. It was casual, almost off-hand, like a bigoted stutter. It wasn’t the first time I had heard the word, but it was the first time it felt pointed, chiseled into the heart of my being. It was two days after the 2016 election.

Before that day, I had never felt that sense of otherness – the feeling that I was somehow alien to my homeland. Because though I am a queer woman of color, I had never before felt that my identities could fuel such casual enmity.

Maybe that was naïve of me, but we do live in …

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Feminism | Posted by Caitlin Templeton on 12/28/2016

I Fall In Love With One’s Soul, Not Their Gender

On being pansexual.

On being pansexual.

When I looked into the eyes of the first woman I ever liked — loved, even — I felt like I finally understood the famous words attributed to Edgar Allan Poe: “the eyes are the window to the soul.” I didn’t just see her, but myself; I saw a reflection of my own soul within hers. It was like a breath of fresh air — or maybe it wasn’t even that. Maybe I was just then breathing for the first time. And, my god, I didn’t even know how I was living before.

But as seemingly simple as my realization for my love for her was, realizing that those feelings meant I was also pansexual wasn’t easy at all. I didn’t wake up one day and decide, …

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Feminism | Posted by Crystal O on 08/22/2016

How I Fit Into Mainstream Pride Events As A Queer Black Woman

Pride

I realized that I wasn’t straight when I was about 15 years old. Soon after, I got involved with my high school’s Gay-Straight Alliance. During one of the club’s meetings, the steering committee chair of an organization called PFLAG (Parents, Friends, and Families of Lesbians of Gays) joined us as a guest speaker. That day proved to be a pivotal one for me. After the committee chair spoke, I attended a PFLAG meeting and became a member of their youth group: Rainbow Youth and Allies. I am now proud to facilitate this group.

Actually coming out, however, was a process that started after I had begun attending PFLAG. I was fairly open about my sexuality at school and was not shy to stand up for myself and for the …

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Feminism | Posted by David G on 06/14/2016

What The Orlando Shooting Means To Me As A Queer Teen

#Orlando

On Sunday night, I couldn’t cry. I didn’t know how to — it was as if every resource I had to deal with deep, inescapable grief had been disabled. I felt short-circuited, wired and rewired out of my current plane of existence.

On Monday, I started breaking down.

A part of me feels like I’m infringing upon other people’s story. I’m not from Orlando and didn’t lose anyone, so I can’t possibly understand what my Orlando counterparts, those who are and did, are going through. And yet on Monday, I began to feel the grief someone feels when they lose a loved one: the void of anger and anguish and the thick fog of confusion. This complex entanglement of emotions weaved together, like vines climbing and suffocating a wall, …

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Feminism | Posted by Kinder L on 02/3/2016

These Are The LGBTQ+ Victories Already Achieved In 2016

2016 could be a game-changer.

2015 was undoubtedly an amazing year for progress in the LGBTQ+ community. Several countries legalized same-sex marriage, including the United States, and others extended adoption rights to same-sex couples as well. Multiple states elected LGBT politicians to office and legislation banning LGBT discrimination was endorsed by the President.

Of course, the community — which still faces disproportionate rates of homelessness and mental illness and poverty — has a long way to go before achieving equality. But even so, thanks in no small part to the many tireless advocates and allies supporting the cause, the movement has already achieved some incredible things this year.

One significant victory is the notable efforts of schools to be more inclusive of trans students. On January 13, for example, …

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Feminism | Posted by Sabrina N on 07/20/2015

The Problem With Rainbow-Tinted Facebook Profile Pictures

Screen Shot 2015-07-18 at 12.47.32 PM

The rainbow-tinted filter.

In the wake of the historic Supreme Court decision to universally legalize same-sex marriage, 26 million Facebook users demonstrated their support by superimposing a rainbow-tinted flag over their profile pictures.

On the one hand, this seemed like an inspiring indication of progress: It quickly, easily, and publicly allowed people to show their support for the SCOTUS decision as well as LGBTQ+ rights more broadly. It functioned both as a symbol of celebration and declaration of one’s stance on an important social issue. A profile picture isn’t a vote, a petition, or even an impassioned status, but it is a way for people who might not otherwise do anything to subtly state their opinion. Changing one’s picture could also inspire others to start a conversation, change their own …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Carolina G on 07/16/2014

Orphan Black: The Feminist Show You Need To Watch

While we are arguably currently experiencing the golden age of TV, thanks to shows like Orange is the New Black, Mad Men, The Game of Thrones, and House of Cards, we are also inundated by shameful, “reality” crap. With so many options, either for exciting, interesting television or mind-numbing selections best used as background noise (for me, it’s “Say Yes to the Dress”. Not even a little bit guilty), it’s hard to know what’s worth spending time on. I’m here to break it down for you.

Orphan Black is the show everyone should be watching. Not only does this show blow the Bechdel test out of the water, but it’s thought-provoking, darkly funny, science-fiction-y in a way that non-geeks can enjoy, and it handles topics that our society cannot …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Annemarie McDaniel on 05/5/2014

America Voted for Laverne Cox, So Why Didn’t TIME Magazine Listen?

When I was in 12th grade, I asked my parents to buy me a subscription to TIME Magazine so I could learn more about current events before heading off to college. I still remember when the TIME 100 Most Influential came in the mail, and the glossy collage of famous faces on its cover.  I read every single bio inside, thinking to myself how I wanted to know the stories of such important and inspiring people. Two years later, TIME 100 has tried more and more to capture the attention of young audiences through social media. TIME’s online poll allowed users to vote for their favorites and then share their votes on Facebook or Twitter. Friends of mine who weren’t regular TIME readers were still tweeting and posting about …

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