Pop-Culture | Posted by Fiona L on 08/11/2014

Jenny Lewis’ The Voyager Is a Feminist Experience

“I’m just another lady without a baby.”

Jenny Lewis’ delivery of this line in “Just One of the Guys,” the third song on her new album, The Voyager, is quiet, yet powerful. She seems almost to be taunting the listener, or possibly to be imitating someone she once heard describe her. In the video for the song, Lewis’ face is serious as she leads up to this sentence, and the camera zooms in on her face. But, the minute she begins to utter the phrase, her lips widen into a smile–an inside joke with herself, perhaps–and she begins to dance.

The Voyager has been making waves since its release on July 29. It’s Lewis’ first solo project in 8 years, and most reviews are overwhelmingly positive. Jeff Himmelman at …

More >

Feminism | Posted by Rinzu Rajan on 02/13/2014

Why Women Are Still Expected To Be Domestic In India

A few weeks ago I was talking to a friend who is going to publish a novel next year. She is exuberant to have become a novelist and was excitedly telling me about the characters in her book. My heart swelled with pride when she told me that she plans to write a second novel, too, I remembered my own dreams of becoming a writer and my own abandoned manuscript. I asked her when she would write her second novel and she told me that she would do so during her first maternity leave, which left me befuddled. Am I the only aspiring writer who is still so torn about her life path? I might regret never becoming a mother, but if I turn my back on motherhood in favor …

More >

Feminism | Posted by Jess F on 10/12/2012

A Newbie’s Rant About Not Wanting Kids

We’re constantly exposed to the stereotype that the only type of women who don’t want kids are the ones that choose a career over a family and who end up old, crazy cat ladies after retirement. Women are never told that we can get married and have a life without children. I just don’t believe that having children is a requirement to be in a long-term, happy relationship. I really don’t believe that if you don’t want kids, you’ll end up a lonely cat woman” - From Ticking Clock by  Alicia L

I have recently discovered the FBomb and, as a teenager, it is so liberating to see that I am not alone in my opinions and frustrations. I quoted the article by Alicia L because it was …

More >

Feminism | Posted by Alicia L on 07/23/2012

Ticking Clock

All women want babies eventually, right?

I come from a big family. I mean huge. My second cousins are starting to have children, so now I even have third cousins — third cousins who require lots of family celebrations. Every baby shower or child’s birthday party I go to, I get asked the same question: “So Alicia…when are YOU having kids?”

I always respond the exact same way with, “I’m not.”

And like clock-work, I always get told the same thing: “One of these days, when you’re older, you’ll WANT kids.” or “Every woman wants kids eventually. It’s natural.”

Which leads me to wonder: What is all this B.S. about a biological clock?

Is there really some crazy ticking time bomb in my uterus ready to break out in some …

More >

Pop-Culture | Posted by Becka W on 05/24/2011

Bossypants: Why We Should All Bask In The Wisdom Of Tina Fey

Tina Fey is awesome. This is not new information. She’s hilarious, successful, and still dedicated to her family. Fey seems genuine and grounded, which is always nice to see in famous people, who I typically imagine snapping for servants on a beach in Cabo, drinking some sort of pink-colored beverage. I read her memoir (of life so far), Bossypants, like, as Mindy Kaling said, “a grown woman’s Twilight” – before I knew it, it was 5 AM, I was giggling to myself surrounded by Diet Coke cans, and my roommate had her pillow over her face, attempting to block out the light from my lamp.

Aside from being insomnia-inducing, Bossypants has some awesome nuggets of genius-wisdom about growing up, womanhood, feminism, motherhood, and women in the workplace without feeling preachy …

More >

Feminism | Posted by Reb V on 12/2/2010

Tell It Like It Is: Demystifying Childbirth for Teens

Last Sunday the Guardian website published an article highlighting the rise in reported birth trauma in the UK. The piece, reported on the National Health Service’s response to the number of women requesting caesarian sections for second births, after bad first experiences have left them too scared to opt for traditional methods.

Tocophobia, or the fear of childbirth is said to be increasing at an alarming rate on these shores and an official study is now under way. As someone who last year had a child of her own, I read the Guardian’s article with great interest, even more so when the selected interviewee Angela Almond described a ‘traumatic’ childbirth experience that was not too dissimilar to that of my own and other mothers I know. Now I would …

More >

Feminism | Posted by Anna M on 09/21/2010

An Unabashed Imitation of An Article by Peggy McIntosh

In 1990, Wellesley College professor Peggy McIntosh wrote an essay called “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack”. McIntosh observes that whites in the U.S. are “taught to see racism only in individual acts of meanness, not in invisible systems conferring dominance on my group.” To illustrate these invisible systems, McIntosh wrote a list of 26 invisible privileges whites benefit from.

As McIntosh points out, men also tend to be unaware of their own privileges as men. In the spirit of McIntosh’s essay, I thought I’d compile a list similar to McIntosh’s, focusing on the invisible privileges benefiting men.

Due to my own limitations, this list is unavoidably U.S. centric. I hope that writers from other cultures will create new lists, or modify this one, to reflect their own …

More >

Articles | Posted by Julie Z on 01/20/2010

An Interview with Amy Richards

Here at The FBomb, we certainly do our part in defining what feminism means to teens today. While we’re still trying to figure out what our effect on feminism will be, the one thing we’re certain of is that despite our appreciation for the first and second waves of feminism, we are a wave unto ourselves – the third wave. It’s important that we develop our own voices and our own community, but bonds of sisterhood that span generations are equally as vital.

Amy Richards, writer (she wrote the AWESOME Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism and the Future), activist and co-founder of the Third Wave Foundation, understands this. The Third Wave Foundation is a “feminist, activist foundation that works nationally to support young women and transgender youth ages 15-30…working …

Related Posts with Thumbnails

More >