Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 03/10/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Angel Haze

Angel Haze

Raykeea Wilson (born 1991), better known by her stage name Angel Haze, is an African American , Native American rapper and lyricist signed to Universal Republic and Island. She was born in Detroit, Michigan and grew up in the Greater Apostolic Faith.

She released her EP Reservation online in July 2012. She is planning a collaboration with Azealia Banks. She lives in Springfield, Virginia. In 2012, she took part in the BET Hip-Hop Award’s Cypher. She was also featured on Funk Volume’s artist Dizzy Wright’s mixtape “SmokeOut Conversations” on the remix track for “Can’t Trust Em’.” The song also featured on the track now Funk Volume artist Jarren Benton. On Angel Haze’s 2012 mixtape Classick, she recorded a version of Eminem’s song, “Cleanin’ Out My Closet”. Earbuddy’s John

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Creative | Posted by Julie Z on 02/24/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Rebecca Ferguson

Rebecca Ferguson

People used to tell Rebecca Ferguson her life was ruined. A teenage mother of two children, dreams of becoming a famous singer seemed far-fetched. Motivated to fulfill her lifelong wish, Rebecca signed up for the tenth season of the UK’s X Factor, and pushed through emotional breakdowns to perform almost every week. Adored quickly by harsh critic and judge Simon Cowell, Rebecca wound up being the show’s runner-up and began crafting songs for her debut album, Heaven, soon after. Coming from a struggling single-parent household, there wasn’t enough money for Rebecca to follow her passion for singing, so at 14 she got a job in a clothes shop to pay for singing lessons. Performing Arts college followed, despite her mother’s attempts to keep her from anything but Christian

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 02/10/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Claire’s Diary

Claire's Diary

Claire’s Diary was formed when Sophie Rae and Isadora Schappell (of Care Bears on fire), Joey Koneko, and Kiri Oliver were strolling through a meadow one day and found the diary of a girl named Claire at the foot of an oak tree. Taking this diary back to their Brooklyn home, they began to sift through the pages of this mysterious diary and translate their discoveries into words and sounds that bring to mind grunge, punk, and surf-rock. Claire’s Diary played their first show at Slutwalk NYC in October 2011 and released their first recorded track, the theme song for Rookie Magazine, ‘Suzy’s Alright’, in October 2011. Claire’s Diary released their double single “Girl Next Door” and “Build Me A Hero” in August 2012 and will be releasing

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 02/3/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: KALEN


Singer-songwriter Kalen’s six-song debut EP, Falling From The Sun, is rock noir. The bruised beauty of her lyrics, her dark and shimmering compositions, the haunting expressiveness of her singing, and her dynamically cinematic producing skills imbue the music with a visual layer of intrigue. It is a moody blend of blues, trip-hop and rock with bits of dub step and world beat that’s artfully accessible.

The New York-based singer first gained notoriety fronting the avant-funk band Ladybug Stingray, a band that combined performance art with abstract dance grooves. With that band she performed from coast to coast, from NYC’s Webster Hall, to Brooklyn’s The Knitting Factory, to LA’s Whiskey A-Go-Go. She also headlined The Wassaic Project’s summer festival twice. As a solo artist, she’s channeled the adventurousness, theatrics, and

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 01/27/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Rachel Potter

Rachel Potter

A rock ‘n roll baby, Rachel was born in New Orleans to southern parents who connected over their mutual passion for song. Potter’s earliest memory of music was at age three, standing on the steps of her Baptist church next to best friend Jamey Ray singing in her hometown of Seminole, Florida. Exposed to music from day one Rachel remembers “My dad played guitar around the house and my mom would always sing harmony to oldies in the car.”

After graduating from college she moved to New York where she got a gig singing in a wedding band. After auditioning for Broadway shows for over a year, she booked the WICKED national tour and THE ADDAMS FAMILY. Rachel was ecstatic to fulfill her dream of Broadway but still

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 01/13/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Annie Dressner

Annie Dressner

Recently moving from her hometown of New York City to the UK, singer-songwriter, Annie Dressner is about to release her newest work – an EP titled “East Twenties” (release date: April 8, 2013).

Dressner’s poignant songs are delivered with such conversational ease, it often seems as if she is reading from an intimate letter or a book, set to music. Her straightforward lyrical style, sharp ear for wordplay and crisp, lilting vocals offer listeners a front-row seat to her stories, as they take shape above the understated music.

Her quirky debut album, “Strangers Who Knew Each Other’s Names” (2011) was featured via iTunes. As seen in the reviews, Dressner is making a strong connection with listeners. The collection of 11 original songs at times evokes Bright Eyes, an

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 09/9/2012

Support Women Artists Sunday: Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings

Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings

By the sound of them, you would think Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings started making funk-threaded soul music together in the 1960s. Few devotedly retro acts are as convincing. Few singers as skilled as Sharon Jones at stuffing notes with ache and meaning might be willing to invest in a sound so fully occupied by the likes of Bettye LaVette and Tina Turner in the Ike years, too. But what Jones brings to the funkified table has legs of its own — eight of them, to be exact — and they belong to Binky Griptite, Bugaloo Velez, Homer Steinweiss, and Dave Guy — her Dap-Kings.

Jones, like James Brown, was born in Augusta, GA; there she sang in her church choir, and from fellow

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 08/26/2012

Support Women Artists Sunday: Emeli Sandé

Emeli Sandé

Gracefully flaunting her rich voice and penchant for sophisticated melody on her debut album, Our Version of Events, Emeli Sandé is instantly revealed as an uncompromising creative force. A fervent singer-songwriter since the age of 10, the now 24-year-old Scottish recording artist got her first big break while still a teenager. But instead of signing to a label, she put her music career on hold and embarked on a six-year degree in medicine. It wasn’t until 2010, with just a year to go, that Sandé decided to take time out from her studies and dedicate herself to her music full-time. After writing a slew of songs for British acts like Leona Lewis, Susan Boyle, Tinie Tempah, and Cheryl Cole (and being noted as Simon Cowell’s “favourite songwriter at

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