Feminism | Posted by Ines R on 07/9/2014

Sexism and Soccer Balls

The other day my friend asked me if I thought a true feminist can support the World Cup. Until this year, I probably would have immediately answered yes: I just associated the World Cup with a somewhat rarefied joy and excitement. Over the years, I have loved witnessing the passion other countries have for their nation’s team and choosing a team to root for with my family (we usually just hop onto the bandwagon of the favored champions since our country, Peru, has not been in the World Cup since 1982). But this year — maybe because I’m older, maybe because it seems more obvious than ever before — I’ve noticed various sexist dynamics surrounding the World Cup.

The World Cup has had a significant impact on women’s lives all …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 02/17/2014

Why #Unapologetic Barbie Might Just Help The Body Positive Cause

As a feminist blogger who consistently deconstructs the way things like Barbie and digitally altered images of models objectify women and hold them to unachievable standards of beauty, I completely understand the growing rage over the frame of Barbie’s newest job as an #unapologetic Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition model. What exactly is Barbie refusing to apologize for, one is left wondering? Her anatomically impossible proportions that have, in fact, been proven to make young girls feel badly about their bodies? Or for sending the message that not even digitally altered models (most of whom meet the criteria for anorexia) are suitable for idealized objectification? But critiques that frame this campaign as the peak of such sexist objectification (though certainly valid — it’s hard to think of a more …

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 01/8/2014

Women’s Football: Feminist or Sexist?

Football seems to be the sport that excludes women the most.  In this day in age we have women’s leagues for softball, baseball, and the WNBA, but football always had men in the spotlight being cheered on by cheerleaders on the sidelines.  However, this is no longer the case.  The Legends Football League, founded in 2009, is a women’s tackle American football league.  These women are passionate about football, and they have a place to play: games are played in the spring and summer in professional men’s arenas and stadiums including those of the NFL.

In many ways the LFL seems like a feminist victory: giving women an opportunity to play football at a high level appears to be a step towards equality. Most teams are coached by former …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Sam H on 10/28/2013

The Black Girl Conundrum

I will never forget the noise that my mother made when she first saw it. We were navigating the streets of New York on a busy Saturday in 2011, running late for a hair appointment. She was walking so briskly that I struggled to keep up. But then she stopped dead in her tracks and made a sound of absolute disgust. I looked around, trying to figure what would make my mother risk being late for an appointment. Then I saw the massive billboard with a black child and the words “The Most Dangerous Place for an African American is in the Womb.” At the time I didn’t understand the message: I could think of hundreds of places that I felt unsafe as a black child. To me, volcanoes, tigers, …

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Feminism | Posted by Sarah M on 06/10/2013

On Internalized Misogyny

The other day, as I sat in math class, I couldn’t help but eavesdrop on a couple of girls seated directly in front of me. They were discussing the volleyball game that was supposed to happen that day after school. At one point, one of the girls noted that the girls on the team had to wear their athletic uniforms around the school for that day (to invigorate school spirit and what not). The other girl responded that it was ridiculous and unfair that the athletes were permitted to break with the school’s dress code for the day (their shorts were *gasp* above their knees), and continued to say that the shorts were “an invitation for rape.” At this point, I was struggling to keep my mouth shut. However, they …

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Feminism | Posted by Camille E on 06/3/2013

I Will Not Be Scared Off The Streets

So, the other day, I was walking downtown on my own (or as I like to say, “independently”), and this guy in a truck hooted at me while I passed the Shell gas station. I shrunk a little, turned around, trying to determine whether it was aimed at me, and meekly flipped him off.

Resuming my walk downtown, I immediately thought about what I was wearing. Hoop earrings, shorts, a tank top. I was testing out this new bra clip that hides the straps, and when I stepped out of my house I felt excited and a little bit proud. I didn’t have to worry about the straps, and I felt good in my skin, not so afraid of people looking at me. But as soon as that guy hooted, …

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Feminism | Posted by Camille B on 04/5/2013

The Story of the Creepy Freshman

Last night I attended the Spring Dance at my (catholic, all-girls) school. I went with a guy named Enrique Iglesias.* He is a very nice guy, and by that I mean he knows how to effectively interact with other human beings and therefore instead of babysitting him I was free to just have fun. And that’s exactly what I did. I danced and danced…and danced. Now to be completely honest I have no rhythm whatsoever. But I do love to dance even if it is just failing my arms like a drunken chimpanzee.

As I was getting down on the dance floor a prepubescent freshman started grinding on me. Again, I just want to emphasize that I dance like an inebriated primate so I have to question hhis initial attraction. …

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Feminism | Posted by mbond on 03/25/2013

GQ’s Impressive Interview With Pussy Riot Is Still A GQ Interview

As Feministing.com reported last summer, three members of the Russian punk rock collective Pussy Riot were convicted in August 2012 and sentenced to two years’ imprisonment for “hooliganism motivated by religious-hatred” and “crudely [undermining] social order.”

Formed in 2011, Pussy Riot consists of a rotating cast of about ten anonymous members. The group is famous for its audaciously anti-government protest songs and flash mob-style performances in brightly colored dresses and balaclavas. The women who first formed Pussy Riot were longtime friends and political activists but had not been performers previously. They sought to use punk rock as a vehicle to reach wider audiences for espousing their political beliefs, particularly regarding government restrictions on legal abortions and other policies of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Before Pussy Riot made worldwide headlines …

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