Feminism | Posted by Fiona L on 11/30/2011

Gaddafi: An Unexpected Advocate for Libyan Women?

When I first heard about the death of Libyan Dictator, Moammar Gaddafi (who seems to be America’s favorite frenemy) my thoughts went to the women of Libya: what would it mean for them? I quickly realized I had no idea. I searched my mind, trying to remember what I’d heard about Libyan women in the news in the past months.

The fact is, I hadn’t heard much at all about Libyan women, because Libyan women are complicated. Okay, all women are complicated (I feel like this could be the title of a book), but the women’s rights situation in Libya is especially complex, because it turns out, Gaddafi was in many ways a supporter of women’s rights—and yes I cringe a little when I say something as general as …

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Articles | Posted by Julie Z on 06/21/2010

An Interview with Zainab Salbi

Zainab Salbi

Zainab Salbi

When Zainab Salbi started Women for Women International, an organization that provides women survivors of war and other conflicts with tools and resources to move from crisis and poverty to stability and self-sufficiency, she was 23 years old. She had left her entire family behind in Iraq only a few years before, bringing with her to America only $400. 16 years later, her organization has raised almost 80 million dollars, helped over 200,000 women and impacted over a million children’s lives.

Salbi’s own experience with the Iran-Iraq war inspired her to help all women dealing with the aftermath of war, in order to achieve the greater goal of promoting viable civil societies worldwide, changing the world one woman at a time. And truly, her experience with war …

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Feminism | Posted by Aleka R on 06/15/2010

Indian Muslim Women: Excluded from Indian Feminism?

Indian Muslim Women: Excluded from Indian Feminism?

Indian Muslim Women: Excluded from Indian Feminism?

In India, the Dar-ul-Uloom’s (an Islamic school propagating Sunni Islam in India) recently declared a new fatwa which states that it is un-Islamic for women to work with men and talk to them. The fatwa is extremely misogynistic in nature.. A huge furor was created in India after the fatwa was issued and it lead to a wide ranging debate with many Muslims divided on the issue. It indicates that reform measures undertaken in the Indian Parliament to uplift the condition of Indian women are useless when it comes to Indian Muslim women. It seems that, while a silent feminist revolution is in the works in India, Muslim women are largely not included in it.

The clerics who issue such fatwas are unwilling …

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