Feminism | Posted by Isaiah Strong on 02/15/2017

I Am Not A ‘Phase’

I'm not a phase.

I’m not a “phase.”

I was standing on the top floor of a fraternity house in the early days of my sophomore year of college. Across the room, I saw an upperclasswoman I had heard about through the grapevine. She was well into a drunken tirade critiquing or complimenting each of my friends’ respective physical appearances and clothing when I approached. Then this young white woman turned to me.

“So Isaiah, you’ve got this whole mixed thing going on for you,” she said. “You should use that to your advantage.”

She clearly didn’t see this drunken comment as problematic, but I was taken aback, confused, and painfully uncomfortable. To her, the idea was that for me — the son of a black father and a white mother — this “whole …

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Feminism | Posted by Angela Liu on 01/3/2017

Xenophobia and the American Identity

Xenophobia: The word of the year

Xenophobia: The word of the year

“Xenophobia,” which, according to, Dictionary.com is a “fear or hatred of foreigners, people from different cultures, or strangers” was Dictionary.com’s 2016 word of the year. The word can also refer to fear or dislike of customs, dress, and cultures of people with backgrounds different from our own. Put more simply, xenophobia is a fear of the “other.”

This word was likely so widespread this past year due in no small part to the United States’ presidential election, as well as the UK’s vote to leave the European Union (widely known as “Brexit“). This fear of the other has been made abundantly clear in the United States through the rhetoric put forth by the Trump campaign. Xenophobic campaign promises to build

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Feminism | Posted by Karla Majdancic on 12/9/2016

#NoDAPL Is A Feminist Issue

#NoDAPL

#NoDAPL

For the past couple of months, I have watched with empathy and solidarity as a great number of Native Americans have been camping out on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota. They have been protesting the construction of a crude oil pipeline called the “Dakota Access pipeline,” which endangers their community. While these protests have been peaceful, protesters faced increasingly violent responses over the past few months. But it seems their hard work has paid off: The Department of Justice, the Department of the Army, and the Department of the Interior just put a temporary ban on the construction of  the pipeline. In reality, however, the battle is a long way from being done.

There are two main issues protesters have taken with the construction of the …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Kayleigh Bolingbroke on 12/5/2016

This New Music Video Powerfully Took On Police Brutality

YG in One Time Comin'

YG in One Time Comin’

In 2012, 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. He was later acquitted of the crime. Two years later, Eric Garner was killed after being placed in a chokehold by police officers, and Michael Brown had been shot to death by a white police officer in Missouri just a month later. Their deaths, along with far too many others, did not represent a new phenomenon, but did awaken a newly powerful, social media-based iteration of a movement for justice: Black Lives Matter.

At least 263 African-Americans in the US died due to police brutality in 2016 alone. The number seems to only grow, and this fact hasn’t gone unnoticed by the media. Over the past two years, Twitter has been …

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Feminism | Posted by Kris Crews on 12/2/2016

Experiencing Racist Microaggressions

They add up.

“You don’t act like a black person,” I was told in middle school.

“What’s your favorite food? Fried chicken?” I was asked in high school.

“You have good hair for a black person, what are you mixed with?” I heard in college.

Growing up, I went to predominately white schools, in which there were only four or five black students.  I naively failed to understand or pay attention to racially-charged comments like these throughout my life because hearing them so often led me to believe they were normal. I never thought about telling my parents about them — I figured the kids who said these things to me were my friends, and friends only joke about that stuff. They weren’t serious.

It wasn’t until I got to …

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Feminism | Posted by Kami Baker on 11/30/2016

How To Go Forward With Love Post-Election

My roommates and I

My roommates and I

On November 9, I went to a watch party for the 2016 election. At first, it was full of hope and promise. We had spent the first half of our days giddy after filling in our very first ballots — ballots with a woman’s name.

This is the day, we thought. Finally.

And then it wasn’t.

My friend Okina and I left the watch party early, because my anxiety was raging and I didn’t want to break my No Xanax Record for a man that looks like a Cheeto. We returned to my dorm room. My three other roommates — Kylie, Shamsa, and Adriana — sat white-knuckled in our living area, CNN on volume 20, our college-issued couch squeaking with even the slightest scared shift.

Kylie …

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Feminism | Posted by Leanne Yuen on 11/28/2016

Fighting Asian American Stereotypes

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It’s time to end the stereotypes once and for all

There’s a common myth that Asian Americans do not experience racism on as grand a level as do other people of color. While many Eastern Asians experience light skin privilege, and violations like police brutality do disproportionately affect African Americans, there is still an urgent need to fight for Asian American rights in this nation, too.

Let’s take the numerous stereotypes that persist about Asian Americans. The most common ones maintain that Asians are fond of rice, proficient in the maths and sciences (and have parents who force them to enter those fields professionally), and prone to being quiet and submissive. How can these stereotypes be offensive or damaging? Many seem to wonder. There’s nothing wrong with liking rice, acing

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 11/7/2016

Experiencing Racial Bias In Preschool

It starts early

When I was in preschool I hated my skin. While I had bronze skin, brown eyes, and brown hair, my friends in preschool looked different. Most of them had fair skin, blue eyes, and blond hair. I thought I could remedy this, could look more like them, by walking with my inner arms turned outwards because that skin was paler than the rest of me.

I remember seeing Snow White, a Disney Princess with “white” in her very name, at age 3. Snow white had brown eyes and dark hair like me, but her skin was so much lighter than mine.  Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, and Ariel also had pale skin like Snow White. I remember wishing that I could look more like a princess, and to me …

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