Feminism | Posted by Kami Baker on 11/30/2016

How To Go Forward With Love Post-Election

My roommates and I

My roommates and I

On November 9, I went to a watch party for the 2016 election. At first, it was full of hope and promise. We had spent the first half of our days giddy after filling in our very first ballots — ballots with a woman’s name.

This is the day, we thought. Finally.

And then it wasn’t.

My friend Okina and I left the watch party early, because my anxiety was raging and I didn’t want to break my No Xanax Record for a man that looks like a Cheeto. We returned to my dorm room. My three other roommates — Kylie, Shamsa, and Adriana — sat white-knuckled in our living area, CNN on volume 20, our college-issued couch squeaking with even the slightest scared shift.

Kylie …

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Feminism | Posted by Leanne Yuen on 11/28/2016

Fighting Asian American Stereotypes

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It’s time to end the stereotypes once and for all

There’s a common myth that Asian Americans do not experience racism on as grand a level as do other people of color. While many Eastern Asians experience light skin privilege, and violations like police brutality do disproportionately affect African Americans, there is still an urgent need to fight for Asian American rights in this nation, too.

Let’s take the numerous stereotypes that persist about Asian Americans. The most common ones maintain that Asians are fond of rice, proficient in the maths and sciences (and have parents who force them to enter those fields professionally), and prone to being quiet and submissive. How can these stereotypes be offensive or damaging? Many seem to wonder. There’s nothing wrong with liking rice, acing

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 11/7/2016

Experiencing Racial Bias In Preschool

It starts early

When I was in preschool I hated my skin. While I had bronze skin, brown eyes, and brown hair, my friends in preschool looked different. Most of them had fair skin, blue eyes, and blond hair. I thought I could remedy this, could look more like them, by walking with my inner arms turned outwards because that skin was paler than the rest of me.

I remember seeing Snow White, a Disney Princess with “white” in her very name, at age 3. Snow white had brown eyes and dark hair like me, but her skin was so much lighter than mine.  Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, and Ariel also had pale skin like Snow White. I remember wishing that I could look more like a princess, and to me …

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Feminism | Posted by Faatimah Solomon on 09/23/2016

The History Of Banning Black Women’s Hair

Amandla Stenberg wearing her hair natural

When I turned twelve, I started faithfully straightening my hair every single week. By the time I was fourteen years old, therefore, I had straightened my hair at least one hundred and four times. At least. But eventually my hair started falling out in large clumps and my mom demanded that I stop severely damaging my hair.

It was then that I began the emotionally draining process of learning how to love myself. I read countless books about feeling beautiful in your own skin and body, stuck a number of pictures of beautiful black women wearing their natural hair on the walls of my closet, and followed Instagram accounts that celebrated the beauty of having black curly hair. With time, I began to love …

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Feminism | Posted by Crystal O on 08/22/2016

How I Fit Into Mainstream Pride Events As A Queer Black Woman

Pride

I realized that I wasn’t straight when I was about 15 years old. Soon after, I got involved with my high school’s Gay-Straight Alliance. During one of the club’s meetings, the steering committee chair of an organization called PFLAG (Parents, Friends, and Families of Lesbians of Gays) joined us as a guest speaker. That day proved to be a pivotal one for me. After the committee chair spoke, I attended a PFLAG meeting and became a member of their youth group: Rainbow Youth and Allies. I am now proud to facilitate this group.

Actually coming out, however, was a process that started after I had begun attending PFLAG. I was fairly open about my sexuality at school and was not shy to stand up for myself and for the …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Angela Liu on 08/17/2016

Why Proper Representation Matters: The Invisible Minority in Pop Culture

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Maybe not so great.

I have never had a hero who looked quite like me. Growing up, my favorite shows on Disney Channel included Hannah Montana and Wizards of Waverly Place – shows with complex, interesting female characters, but which also had predominantly white casts. Like millions of other young girls, I rooted for Miley Cyrus and Selena Gomez: – I laughed at their jokes, celebrated their successes, and felt for them when they fell. Like millions of other young girls of color, however, I had no role models who looked like I did.

I was sitting down with my family at dinner recently when a CNN notification popped up on my phone, alerting me that Matt Damon had been cast in a new film called The Great Wall. …

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Feminism | Posted by Vicki S on 08/10/2016

The Powerful Message of Mothers of the Movement

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Mothers of the Movement.

On Tuesday, July 26th, several mothers of police brutality victims spoke at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. United by the organization Mothers of the Movement,  the women joined together to speak about their purpose as a coalition and show support for Hillary Clinton.

Geneva Reed-Veal, mother of Sandra Bland, spoke first as audience members chanted “Black Lives Matter.” She commenced by talking about what it was like when her daughter was found hanging in her jail cell after an unlawful arrest one year ago. She went on to say the names of six other women who died in custody in the month of July of 2015, including Kindra Chapman, Sarah Lee Circle Bear, Raynette Turner, Ralkina Jones, Joyce Curnell, and …

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Feminism | Posted by Mai D on 04/27/2016

The Truth About Having “Bad” Hair

One brand of hair relaxer.

I am a young Senegalese woman with “kinky” hair — specifically, type 4A/4B according to Andre Walker’s hair chart  — and I have heard every comment in the book about it. Since preschool I have been told I have “bad hair” by everyone from Dominican hair stylists to my African family members who have constantly begged me to relax it in order to look “proper” and “decent.” No matter the specific critique, my hair has always been deemed wrong by others.

My older, female cousins were the first to influence my hair. I grew up with three older brothers and my mother usually kept my hair braided so neither of us had to think too much about it. At the ripe age of eight, however, …

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