Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 08/4/2012

Saturday Vids: No Joke. Choice Matters. Everywhere.

The folks over at Pathfinder, a great reproductive health organization, recently launched No Joke. #ChoiceMatters. Everywhere., a campaign to raise awareness about international reproductive health care. The campaign is focused on building a movement to help more people around the globe access modern contraceptives.

Says Pathfinder about the following video: “We created this video to help people understand the reproductive health barriers women across the world experience. It’s done tongue-in-cheek, but as you know, the reality is no joke: women around the world face many barriers to reproductive health care that we wouldn’t stand for here in the US.”

If you liked this video, help spread the word. Here’s a sample tweet to get you started:

Agree #ChoiceMatters everywhere? Watch VIDEO http://bit.ly/ChoiceMatters via @PathfinderInt of #reprohealth barriers …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 04/21/2012

Saturday Vids: Nineteen Percent on The Erosion of Roe v. Wade

This video is a few months old but I stumbled across it recently and think it’s still (always) very relevant, and a good review of where we were on the reproductive rights debate in 2011. Also, I love Nineteen Percent.

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Articles, Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 02/1/2012

An Interview With Merle Hoffman

Merle Hoffman

Merle Hoffman

Merle Hoffman is the publisher/editor-in-chief of On The Issues Magazine and one of the most outspoken advocates for progressive and feminist issues.

Merle established Choices Women’s Medical Center to provide abortion services shortly after New York State legalized abortion in 1971. Today, Choices has grown to become one of the most comprehensive and nationally well respected providers of a full range of gynecological services for women, including abortion to 24 weeks of pregnancy, birth control and pre-natal care.

In 1983 Merle began On the Issues Magazine as a newsletter of Choices Women’s Medical Center to communicate with other health care providers, pro-choice activists and the reproductive health care community generally. Within a few years it had developed into On the Issues, the Progressive Woman’s Quarterly, gaining accolades as

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Feminism | Posted by Cimorene on 01/9/2012

We Can’t Judge What We Can’t Understand

A few days ago, I went to school. It was a normal day until around lunchtime when I started hearing some rumors. Well, that’s not unusual: it’s high school. There will always be rumors. But these rumors were different. They were based on a newspaper article published that morning in a local online newspaper. The article told the story of a girl, age 16, who goes to my school. The article, which was based on a police report, claimed that earlier this year the girl had a stillborn baby that no one knew about. The girl didn’t know she was pregnant, had the baby in her bathtub, and then buried it in her backyard. The girl’s mother later found the body and called the police. The girl is now facing …

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Feminism | Posted by Shirley Kailas on 12/23/2011

The Plan B Decision: Sacrificing “Change We Can Believe In” for Expediency?

Like every other rational individual in our country, I was in a state of utter shock when I heard the news that, for the first time in history, the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) had overruled a fact-based decision by the FDA. While this type of nonsensical anti-choice maneuver is something pro-choicers have had to deal with in the past, the fact that it was carried out by a Democratic administration was nothing less than devastating. The administration ignored sound evidence (and women’s basic rights) and did what they are quickly becoming best known for, sacrificing “change we can believe in” for “never mind what’s right, I will shirk away from anything that could possibly be considered controversial and cost me a vote in my …

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Feminism | Posted by Holly Grigg-Spall on 12/12/2011

Ms-guided: I Was A Teen On Drugs

what do you really know about the Pill?

what do you really know about the Pill?

When I was 17 years-old I was put on the birth control pill. I had painful, heavy periods that would get me out of gym class, but that wasn’t the only reason I was taken to the doctor. My mum, who became an adult in the 1960s, just as the Pill was introduced as a tool for female liberation, was afraid I would get pregnant. Not that I had a boyfriend, or even had sex – and, in fact, I wouldn’t for another four years. It was just the responsible thing to do, the right thing to do, and I swallowed that, quite literally, without question. I had no idea how the Pill worked, nor even how my own body worked. Aside …

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Feminism | Posted by Angela G on 06/27/2011

New Jersey: Women’s Health #Fail

Three months ago, the country was on fire for women’s health. Remember that rally for women’s health in Foley Square where thousands turned out to hear Congressman Anthony Weiner, Kathleen Hanna, Jasmine Burnett, Cecile Richards, and countless other champions for reproductive rights?

Well, a lot has changed since then, and I’m not talking about Weinergate. At the Rally for Women’s Health, I decided I needed to take a public stand and talk about my own experience as a proud patient of Planned Parenthood. I made a YouTube video explaining that I first started using Planned Parenthood as a teen with no money and nowhere to turn for private, safe, and affordable “well-woman” care. I sent it to everyone I could think of.

A few weeks later, I was invited by …

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Feminism | Posted by Alli B on 04/5/2011

Racism and Sexism: Are Both Still Problems?

we need to get rid of ALL prejudice

we need to get rid of ALL prejudice

I recently heard some of  my classmates talking about how sexism really isn’t as big a problem today as racism is. They said that racism is on a different level and that all the feminists need to shut their mouths and just get over it. On Women’s Day,  one student stated that the day shouldn’t be a big deal because women’s struggles are not the same, or as serious, as racial ones. I didn’t say anything, but I was upset by what he said. I do not agree with this, and it hurts me that people feel that way.

I feel that sexism and racism are both equally horrible in their own right, and to separate or rank them doesn’t do anybody …

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