Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 09/18/2011

Support Women Artists Sunday: The Go-Go’s

The Go-Gos

The Go-Go's

The Go-Go’s were the most popular all-female band to emerge from the punk/new wave explosion of the late ’70s and early ’80s, becoming one of the first commercially successful female groups that wasn’t controlled by male producers or managers. While their hit singles — “We Got the Beat,” “Our Lips Are Sealed,” “Vacation,” “Head Over Heels” — were bright, energetic new wave pop, the group was an integral part of the Californian punk scene. And they did play punk rock, even if many of their rougher edges were ironed out by the time they recorded their first album, 1981′s Beauty and the Beat.

Even as they became America’s darlings, the Go-Go’s lived the wild life of rockers. More importantly, their earliest music — now collected on Return to

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Sophie Rae on 07/13/2011

Party Whipped: The Trials of a Teenage Feminist Rocker

First gig! Yes, as a matter of fact I DID think I looked cool.

First gig! Yes, as a matter of fact I DID think I looked cool.

I think I’ve always been somewhat of a feminist, even if I didn’t know it.

When I started playing in bands when I was 9, I didn’t have any idea that my gender would be an issue. Music was what I loved, and to my Trash and Vaudeville size 00 jeans-wearing self, playing super-distorted covers of Clash songs seemed like the most natural thing in the world.

But as we kept playing and as my nievaté began to dwindle (I had reached the age of 12 and my peak of intellectual maturity), I started to notice something weird. In interviews, I was asked to talk not about my music but about my favorite lip gloss flavor …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 01/19/2011

Beauty Pageants: What You Should Do Instead

Teresa Scanlan: The 17-year-old Miss America

Teresa Scanlan: The 17-year-old Miss America

I usually don’t pay attention to beauty pageants anymore. My reasons for hating them are pretty obvious and I’ve written about them here before. They blatantly objectify women. If they’re boosting “self-esteem,” as pageant promoting talking heads often claim they do, then it seems to me that said confidence is mostly based on being held up as a figure of immense beauty in a global society where beauty is valued above all else. And while confidence is great, that’s a pretty shallow and transparent thing to feel confident about. And I get that a woman should be able to do whatever the hell she wants (within reason) and that entering a beauty pageant is a choice, but if we cut the shit the …

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Feminism | Posted by Sarah M on 12/28/2010

Hey, You! Go Make a Zine!

Are you interested in writing, creating, drawing, and DIY (“do it yourself”) ethics? Then you, my friend, should write a zine. A zine is a self published mini-magazine that can be about anything you want. Zines can be written, typed, drawn, xeroxed – it is all up to the creator. Zines have been a part of feminism to spread DIY punk feminism etc through local communities.

Zines can be traced back to riot grrrl bands, who created zines to spread their messages to their fans. Zines have recently been in decline because of blogs, but zines allow you to make a messy, imperfect, raw, funny, and inspiring piece of art that stands out in a world that obsesses over perfection and cleanliness.

To get started on a zine, …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 05/16/2010

Support Women Artists Sunday: Electrik Emily


Electrik Emily

Electrik Emily

Electrik Emily is a 26 year old rock musician, blogger, and all around “women in music” buff, currently living in Seattle, WA.

Born in rural Pennsylvania, her musical career began as a rebellious teen in high school, forming her own all-female rock band in the tradition of The Runaways, playing fast, aggressive, and loud music. In and out of bands all through college, Emily decided to “go her own way” by becoming a feminist backed solo artist after taking a women studies class.

“I finally had an intellectual epiphany you could say, that reflected my thoughts and feelings about being female in a world that didn’t always feel welcoming. I knew I was a feminist, I just never had a word for it until then.”

Emily

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 02/22/2010

GRITtv Interviews Kathleen Hanna

Kathleen Hanna

Kathleen Hanna

I love Kathleen Hanna and Bikini Kill. A lot. So when I saw this very recent interview with her, considering she doesn’t do that many, I knew I had to share! She talks about zines v. blogging, the Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls, feminist leadership and…*sigh* she’s just awesome.

GRITtv writes:

Kathleen Hanna came into a music scene in the 90s that was angry, violent, and full of men. She and her bandmates in Bikini Kill, along with the rest of the riot grrrl movement, pushed back against that culture and helped usher in a new “wave” of feminism. After Bikini Kill, Hanna went on to make feminist dance music with Le Tigre and has kept pushing boundaries ever since. Recently, she donated her zine

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 08/9/2009

Support Women Artists Sunday: Bikini Kill

It’s baaaaaaack. 

This week – a little history lesson. The post on Care Bears on Fire, and the comments about the riot grrrl movement got me thinking. Most girls my age don’t even know what the riot grrrl movement was. 

Riot Grrrl Online describes the movement (they’re also a great riot grrrl resource): 

Riot Grrrl began in 1991 at Olympia Washington, when a few girls (mostly from Bikini Kill and Bratmobile) decided to get together and talk about their main interests: feminism and punk rock. The first time they met it was all fun, they put up posters to get attention of other open minded girls. Then they found out they had other things in common: they were all vegetarians; against drugs; and had been molested as children.

At

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