Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 03/25/2015

Lena Dunham, Mindy Kaling and the Importance of Live Panels

I’m a fan of both Lena Dunham and Mindy Kaling. Yet I found myself somewhat surprised by just how impressive I found both women while recently watching their contributions to a Sundance live panel moderated by Emily Nussbaum via YouTube. I tried to pinpoint why exactly I was so taken with the extent to which I found both women endearingly self-aware, thoughtful and humble.

Perhaps, I finally realized, it had something to do with the panel format itself. Instead of answering the typical lazily sexist questions both women are frequently asked — like about existing as a female in Hollywood or what it was like to work with [insert male co-star here] — these talented individuals were given open platforms to discuss substantive issues they actually care about. Dunham, Kaling …

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 03/12/2015

Lost Women of History: Abigail Adams

At some point during their education, American students learn about John Adams: an American founding father, the country’s second president, and an advocate of American independence from Britain. However, he was not an advocate for the independence of women, and unfortunately, most students never have the opportunity to learn about his wife Abigail Adams, who was.

Before she became John Adams’ wife, Abigail Adams was the daughter of a respected Massachusetts minister. Because the colonists followed the British practice of denying women formal education, she never received proper schooling and became a wife and mother to six children. While her husband fought for his country’s freedom, his wife raised their children and managed their home and farm while coping under the strains of war. These constraints, however, didn’t stop her …

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 12/5/2014

Lost Women of History: Boudicca

Boudicca

Editor’s note: I have always been a strong proponent of making education about, celebration of, and respect for history a significant part of the feminist movement. The entire first chapter of A Little F’d Up: Why Feminism Is Not A Dirty Word is actually a broad overview of the incredible women who came before us. Trailblazing women are routinely left out of the history books and, beyond this being insulting to their brave and historic work and memory, it can often lead to young women today failing to realize just how far we’ve come in a relatively short period of time. So, in that spirit, we’re starting a series on the FBomb devoted to remembering some of these figures.

“…a terrible disaster occurred in Britain. Two cities were sacked, …

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Feminism | Posted by Francesca on 09/10/2014

So She Did: The Female Mentor That Changed My Life

I always expected that I’d spend my last summer before starting college binge-watching TV, eating pizza, and dealing with anxiety about my freshman year.  Instead, I ended up exploring my recent acquaintance with the feminist movement through an internship with So She Did, an organization related to women’s empowerment. I decided to join the organization because it seemed like the perfect opportunity to get a different perspective on feminism and my own ideas about empowerment. Sure enough, working there resulted in one of the best and most interesting summers of my life.

So She Did focuses on a positive and personalized understanding of feminism: it emphasizes individual improvement by showing young women how to say no, how to make a great first impression, how to conquer their fears and …

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Feminism | Posted by Emma M on 08/13/2014

Talk the Talk: On Being A Role Model

Always' "Like A Girl" Commercial

Lately, I have been swept up in the flurry of beautiful videos detailing why what we say to young girls matters – videos from companies like Always and Verizon. Videos that remind me why I am thankful every day to have attended an all-girls school that planted the seeds of early feminism.

I am, perhaps, more attuned to these videos right now. I spend my summer months on staff at a performing arts day camp at which I was a camper for most of my life. Our camp teaches its staff skills in child development and social work. Staff members recall their time as campers and recount how little things their counselors said – cheering them on in rehearsal, congratulating them after a performance, …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Eliza V on 05/19/2014

The Fault In This Star

Shailene Woodley

Shailene Woodley certainly seems to be a star on the rise. She has starred in numerous successful teen movies in the past year alone, such as The Spectacular Now, Divergent and the soon to be released and much anticipated, The Fault in Our Stars. These roles and previous interviews had led me to conclude that she’s a great advocate for the current feminist movement and a marvelous role model for younger girls. She cares about the environment, she doesn’t seem totally obsessed with her appearance and she’s a driven, successful young actress. So, I was a bit taken aback when I read an article where she clearly stated that she did not identify as a feminist.

However, what shocked me was not just that she didn’t …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 01/11/2014

Saturday Vids: Celebrating the Heroic Women of 2013

Is this a corporate video produced by Microsoft as a way to promote their products? Yes. Did it still make me happy to see clips of inspiring women who made 2013 great set to an over-played pop song? Yes, again. Happy (belated) new year, everybody.

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Angela B on 11/18/2013

The SNL Scandal

I love Kerry Washington. She is probably one of my all time favorite actresses. Her character on Scandal is smart, intelligent and well written, a rarity for black actresses today. When I found out Washington was going to be on Saturday Night Live, I was beyond stoked and couldn’t wait to see the episode when it aired on November 3rd.

The week before the episode, there was a large amount of news coverage about the lack of diversity in the SNL cast. Specifically, since the show premiered in 1975, there have been only four black female cast members.  SNL cast member Kenan Thompson told TV Guide Magazine that the reason SNL isn’t hiring black female comedians is because they “just aren’t ready and the talent pool is limited.” …

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