Feminism | Posted by Talia on 11/12/2012

Phyllis Schlafly: Groundbreaker?

Phyllis Schlafly

For today’s young feminists, the name Phyllis Schlafly may be totally unfamiliar; if anything, it triggers a distant memory of a footnote in an AP US History textbook. Those activists who lived and fought during the Second Wave are, however, all too familiar with the uber-conservative activist.

Ever since the 1940s, Schlafly has preached that women should be barefoot, pregnant, and in the kitchen. She has said things like “By getting married, the woman has consented to sex, and I don’t think you can call it rape,” and has called Roe v. Wade “the worst decision in the history of the US Supreme Court.” She recently endorsed the candidacy of Todd Akin, of “the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down” infamy. In …

More >

Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 07/7/2012

Saturday Vids: Shree Bose, Teenage Cancer Researcher

Shree Bose

Shree Bose has inspired me since I learned that she was the Grand Prize winner of the Google Global Science Fair. As her TEDxwomen’s speaker’s page describes: “[Shree's] award-winning project involved the study of a particular protein, AMP kinase, of interest in cancer cells. Through tests on inhibiting this protein’s activity, her research determined its extreme importance in the development of chemotherapy resistance. She proposed a new way to treat resistant patients when they no longer respond to the chemotherapy drug. For the over 240,000 patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, this research will reduce the recurrence rates in patients treated with particular chemotherapy drugs.” Pretty amazing, considering she just graduated high school. I wanted to share with everybody Shree’s entry for the Women’s Media Center’s Girls State

More >

Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 03/31/2012

Saturday Vids: Hillary Clinton’s Greatest Moments

“’Let it be that human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights.’ So said Hillary Clinton before the 1995 U.N. Women’s Conference in Beijing. Since then, Clinton has led a crusade for women around the world, advocating equal rights and opportunities that came to a head during her speech at this year’s Women in the World Summit. From contraception and abortion to the need for women in politics, watch our mashup of Clinton’s best speeches on women’s rights.”

In honor of the last day of Women’s History Month, let’s give it up for Hillary.

via The Daily Beast

More >

Feminism | Posted by Claire C on 03/12/2012

Small Steps On The Feminist Journey

Women LEAD

I can’t pinpoint one event that transformed me into a feminist activist – rather, a succession of small personal events led to a decision to co-found my own women’s rights organization and make a lifelong commitment to fighting gender inequality wherever it may be.

I feel like I always knew I was a feminist. There were things in life that bothered me, that I knew were wrong. Walking to take the bus to school one morning, at 17 years old, a nagging realization bothered me. The domestic worker (or maid as she is called here in Singapore) was washing the car in her employer’s driveway at 7:30 in the morning. I heard that she wasn’t given a day’s rest, ever. She could only leave the house when her …

More >

Pop-Culture | Posted by Fiona L on 01/27/2012

Was “Iron Lady” Too Soft On Margaret Thatcher?

Meryl Streep and Margaret Thatcher

Meryl Streep and Margaret Thatcher

Being the avid history nerd that I am, I was basically counting down the minutes until the opening of Iron Lady, the new film chronicling Margaret Thatcher’s life, starring Meryl Streep. I mean, what could be better than Meryl Streep (who is awesomeness in human form) taking on a complex, fascinating character like Prime Minister Thatcher, right? Regardless of your politics, Margaret Thatcher’s story is an exciting one.

I was expecting a few things from the film. First, I was expecting a kick-butt performance from Ms. Streep. Second, I was expecting to learn more about Margaret Thatcher’s political and personal story, since I don’t know that much about her. Third, I was expecting to be thoroughly entertained.

Unfortunately, only one of my three expectations was …

More >

Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 12/18/2011

Support Women Artists Sunday: Joan Mitchell

Joan Mitchell (February 12, 1925 – October 30, 1992) was a “second generation” abstract expressionist painter. She was an essential member of the American Abstract expressionist movement, even though much of her career took place in France. Along with Lee Krasner, Grace Hartigan, and Helen Frankenthaler she was one of her era’s few female painters to gain critical and public acclaim. Her paintings and editioned prints can be seen in major museums and collections across America and Europe.

Mitchell was born in Chicago, Illinois, the daughter of James Herbert and Marion Strobel Mitchell. She studied at Smith College, in Massachusetts, and The Art Institute of Chicago. After moving to Manhattan in 1947, she wanted to study at Hans Hofmann’s school in New York but, according to Jane Livingston in her …

More >

Pop-Culture | Posted by Lauren M on 12/2/2011

My New Hermione: Miranda Lambert

Miranda Lambert: The New Hermione Granger?

Miranda Lambert: The New Ultimate Heroine?

Ever since the beginning, Hermione Granger has been praised as being the first female character who showed girls that it is ok to be the hero of the story, to be smart, to stick up for yourself and to not take a back seat to the boys. Now that the series is over, who will us girls look to for inspiration? I think I may have found our answer in the music world.

You may know her as an outlaw of country music. Or you may know her as Blake Shelton’s “honey bee.” Or you may have no idea who she is. Her name is Miranda Lambert and she is my heroine: she’s my new Hermione. Bet she’s never gotten that comparison before.

Miranda …

More >

Pop-Culture | Posted by Amanda C on 08/22/2011

Teardrops On My Car – or, Why Taylor Swift Doesn’t Seem To Drive Much

There is no shortage of coverage on Taylor Swift. In the music industry, in teen magazines, on TV, or even (yes) feminist circles – she’s a cultural icon; how could we not talk about her? I think of her as a guilty pleasure. I think her songs are catchy and cute and though her obsession with boyfriends and her slut shaming are certainly far from feminist, I don’t think that listening to Taylor Swift songs spells doom for the feminist movement. It’s impossible to cover all the feminist/antifeminist implications of Taylor’s music in a single post. I just want to point out a pattern I have noticed over the course of her three albums: she mentions driving a lot. This is not a phenomenon unique to Taylor or even music …

More >