Feminism | Posted by Saskia G on 01/13/2016

What Does Voting Really Mean? A Look At Saudi Arabian Women’s First Election

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Saudi Arabian women voters

Saudi Arabia is known for limiting women’s rights. Women who live in the conservative Islamic nation must wear an abaya, a full-length black cloak covering their hair and body, and an additional scarf over the face is optional but recommended. Women cannot travel, marry, or attend university without permission from male family members. As protests recently revealed, many Saudi Arabian women also still cannot drive, despite a tentative new policy meant to enforce the right.

But as of 2015, they can vote. What’s more, they can run for office.

Saudi Arabia is one of the last nations in the world to grant women suffrage. Although the nation held its first election since 1964 just a decade ago in 2005, according to BBC, women were not …

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Feminism | Posted by Emily Jane G on 06/4/2012

Defending the Relevance of Feminism

Obama thinks feminism is still relevant

One of the main problems with calling yourself a feminist today is that it can be hard to explain why it is still needed. On the surface, many goals of feminism seem to already have been achieved and therefore many people seem to think  feminism in the 21st century redundant. It is undeniable that since its beginnings, feminism has achieved a lot: women can now vote, we are allowed to work in previously male-dominated fields, we can wear whatever we want (albeit, more or less, apparently). Overall, though, the status of women has greatly improved. So, is feminism still needed? In a word: yes.

To see the relevance of feminism today, we only need to look beyond the Western world. Women in other …

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Feminism | Posted by Fiona L on 10/3/2011

Is Suffrage for Saudi Women Justice, or Just Words?

In a society where women can’t leave the house without their faces covered and aren’t allowed to drive, how much does the right to vote really mean?

Global pressures aided in getting women the right to vote and run for office in Saudi Arabia last week. Unfortunately, “the right to vote” is used very loosely when it comes to Saudi Arabian politics. With an intact monarchy, a tight set of laws based on religious texts, and a society which allows for few freedoms for women, Saudi Arabian King Abdullah’s promise that women will be able to further participate in politics rings a little bit empty to me.

First of all, what does it mean for women to “get the right to vote” or “run for office” in a country …

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