Feminism | Posted by Virginia Jiang on 01/20/2017

Why I March

Are you going to March?

Are you going to March?

I remember the first time I was called a fag.

It was on a crisp fall day. I was walking to class. A man passed by me. It was casual, almost off-hand, like a bigoted stutter. It wasn’t the first time I had heard the word, but it was the first time it felt pointed, chiseled into the heart of my being. It was two days after the 2016 election.

Before that day, I had never felt that sense of otherness – the feeling that I was somehow alien to my homeland. Because though I am a queer woman of color, I had never before felt that my identities could fuel such casual enmity.

Maybe that was naïve of me, but we do live in …

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Feminism | Posted by Madeline Redell on 12/30/2016

The Underlying Sexism of Playing An Instrument

I faced surprising sexism.

I faced surprising sexism.

I was the textbook definition of an awkward twelve-year-old. I had braces, wild frizzy hair, and tended to match my eyeshadow to the color of any one my assorted array of graphic tees. This was only made worse by the fact that everybody else around me seemed to have already begun their evolutions into their cooler and more stylish selves. The final nail in the coffin of my social status seemed to be my interest in joining the school band.

I was aware of the stigma associated with being in band before I even chose which instrument I wanted to play. Many classic teen movies and TV shows have depicted the band kids as “nerds” who are subjected to teasing and the objects of others’ laughter. …

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Feminism | Posted by Susannah Keogh on 12/21/2016

The Bigger Problem Online Harassment Indicates

The truth about online harassment.

The truth about online harassment.

Two weeks ago, my friend Izzy accepted a Facebook friend request from a mutual friend of a friend. Let’s call him “Chris.” She thought nothing of it until she read the comments his friends left on the post announcing their “friendship.” They were the kind of sexist slurs that regard women as pieces of meat: every comment tore her body to shreds. I had never before seen someone make comments like these directly to someone I care about and was enraged.

Izzy and I called this person out on his behavior in a Facebook post that went on to describe just how widespread sexual harassment is. But the sexist comments still flowed. It was “just a bit of banter,” these commenters said, adding that they  …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Graves on 12/19/2016

Calling Out Everyday Sexism

We can all be super girls.

We can all be super girls.

Content Warning: this article contains a discussion of sexual assault. 

The other day, my best friends and I were casually chatting in a group message. Between complaining about homework and our crushes, we also discussed the instances when guy’s hands have crept too far up our thighs without our permission, the experiences that left us wanting to file our skin down raw to erase every trace of contamination. We discussed these instances without raising red flags, without explicitly labeling these actions for what they are: sexual assault. I guess it’s easy to forget the magnitude of an event that has become a daily occurrence.

The common thread we found in this discussion was the shame that buries in the pits of our stomachs as …

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Feminism | Posted by Kami Baker on 11/30/2016

How To Go Forward With Love Post-Election

My roommates and I

My roommates and I

On November 9, I went to a watch party for the 2016 election. At first, it was full of hope and promise. We had spent the first half of our days giddy after filling in our very first ballots — ballots with a woman’s name.

This is the day, we thought. Finally.

And then it wasn’t.

My friend Okina and I left the watch party early, because my anxiety was raging and I didn’t want to break my No Xanax Record for a man that looks like a Cheeto. We returned to my dorm room. My three other roommates — Kylie, Shamsa, and Adriana — sat white-knuckled in our living area, CNN on volume 20, our college-issued couch squeaking with even the slightest scared shift.

Kylie …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Farha K on 11/23/2016

Wifey Material

Wifey.

It has been almost one hundred years since the Women’s Bureau was established in the Department of Labor. The Bureau aimed to promote the welfare of wage-earning women and for their rights to be respected in the workforce. But this progress was simultaneously, continuously threatened by the stereotype of the “good wife.” American men were expected to yearn for (and receive) the retro misogynistic fantasy of coming home to a spotless house, good meal, and an effortlessly beautiful woman.

I once thought that this blatantly sexist expectation of women had long been retired, but a recent pop-culture fad disproved this misconception and reinforced the reality that so many men still expect their wives to cook and clean for them: Namely, the social media-based “wifey” meme.

The “wifey” fad basically …

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 11/7/2016

Experiencing Racial Bias In Preschool

It starts early

When I was in preschool I hated my skin. While I had bronze skin, brown eyes, and brown hair, my friends in preschool looked different. Most of them had fair skin, blue eyes, and blond hair. I thought I could remedy this, could look more like them, by walking with my inner arms turned outwards because that skin was paler than the rest of me.

I remember seeing Snow White, a Disney Princess with “white” in her very name, at age 3. Snow white had brown eyes and dark hair like me, but her skin was so much lighter than mine.  Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, and Ariel also had pale skin like Snow White. I remember wishing that I could look more like a princess, and to me …

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Feminism | Posted by Blythe Drucker on 10/11/2016

My Fight To End Sexist Harassment In Schools

#DayoftheGirl

#DayoftheGirl

In the summer of 2015, I discovered feminism. While I had previously been aware of the fight for gender equality, I had never really educated myself on the movement and its values. Like many others, I was aware of the stigma that clings to the word “feminist” but was not entirely aware of its actual definition. For that reason, I was not exactly jumping at the opportunity to brand myself with the title. But then, I spent ten days at Barnard College’s Young Women’s Leadership institute, and everything changed.

At YWLI, I was surrounded by young women who proudly fought for the feminist cause. At first, I was intimidated by their knowledge and worried that what little I knew about the movement was inadequate, yet that trepidation soon passed …

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