Feminism | Posted by Amber c on 08/31/2015

The Broken Concept of Virginity

Virginity is a destructive, heteronormative concept.

Society obsesses over the concept of virginity. Young girls are taught that they must meet standards of “purity” and “cleanliness” — standards that are determined by whether or not we have had sex yet. But placing so much importance on a social construct essentially designed to perpetuate a culture of slut-shaming and rape culture is dangerous to young girls’ health and well-being.

The truth is there is no medical or biological definition of virginity. The dictionary defines virginity as “the state of never having had sexual intercourse,” but this definition is largely meaningless. While the dominant understanding of “sexual intercourse” is penetrative sex, this ignores all of the people who have plenty of sex that isn’t penetrative. Can they not lose their virginity? How …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Lexi V on 08/18/2015

How ‘The Bachelorette’ Proves Slut-Shaming Is Alive and Well

Credit: YouTube

Kaitlyn Bristowe

Ok, I’ll admit to watching an episode or two (or six) of The Bachelorette this season. For those who haven’t watched, the show focuses on one woman’s quest to find a perfect match among a group of male suitors. Like The Bachelor — the show on which this one is based — she eliminates men every week until she finds the right partner. As a feminist, I certainly have many issues with the show, but one of the biggest (and perhaps most prominent this past season in particular) is the intense slut-shaming the Bachelorette faced.

Slut shaming has been evident in past seasons, but when Kaitlyn Bristowe, the star of this past season, decided that she wanted to have sex with one of the contestants, she faced a …

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Feminism | Posted by Marianne I on 05/26/2015

These Ten Tumblr Posts Were My Feminist Education

Credit: https://41.media.tumblr.com/6a2b47af46e0b3832919027bcca265ba/tumblr_mwjj7nIrUF1qc7fmjo5_1280.jpg

I wasn’t introduced to the notion of feminism, the discussion of equal rights or the culture of slut shaming until recently. I’ve never had a classroom debate about whether or not men should be called feminists and I didn’t know much about racial profiling.

My knowledge lagged, that is, until I got a Tumblr account. It seems that few educators tolerate electronic devices in the classroom, but the fact is I’ve learned so much from this massive media feed. I’ve learned that no matter where you come from — no matter what gender, age, race, or other identity — there are thousands of feminist Tumblr posts that will likely resonate.

These posts vary: Some are funny and joyful, others serious and educational. But so many represent the issues …

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Feminism | Posted by Megan G on 03/20/2015

Nightclubs: A Culture of Harassment

The first time I experienced harassment in a club, a man came up behind me and put his hand under my dress and in between my legs. I was horrified. I felt dirty, violated and mortified. As the night went on, however, my feelings changed to anger. How dare he touch me like that without any consent? When my anger reached a boiling point I left the club to get some air and squawked indignantly about what had just happened as soon as I saw my friends. A few minutes later I learned that the same man had grabbed one of my friends bums and then just laughed. It was after this night that I decided to find out more.

It has become clear that my friend and …

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Feminism | Posted by Sarah Landrum on 03/4/2015

These 10 Forms of Sexism Are Why I Identify As A Feminist

To say sexism and gender-based discrimination don’t exist would be like claiming oceans aren’t wet. There are, in fact, many issues facing women of the present, and they need to be addressed. So thank you, feminism, for acknowledging the many problems facing women today.

Without feminism, these important topics — like victim blaming, unequal pay and abortion — would be silently slid under the rug and our world would be way worse off. So let’s face these obstacles head-on, like the strong and empowered individuals we are.

Body Image

The media sucks. Thanks to stick-thin models and Photoshopping to boot, women have come to covet dangerously thin bodies. We battle with it constantly, as acquiring these body types requires nothing short of starvation. When we consider that as many as …

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Feminism | Posted by Emily Lindin on 02/23/2015

On “Just Wanting Attention,” Slut Shaming, and Why We Shouldn’t Apologize

I hear from a lot of girls who are struggling through the hell that is being labeled a “slut” in middle school or high school. Often, they just want to know that they’re not alone. Sometimes, they want to share their experiences with me and even publicly, through The UnSlut Project.

I love hearing from these girls – after all, they are the very reason I started this project by posting my own middle school diaries online back in 2013. But I’ve noticed a disturbing trend in their messages: Many girls will begin their emails with a disclaimer along the lines of, “I’m not looking for attention, but…” or “I know you might think I just want attention, but…” and it always makes me cringe.

Here they are, bravely …

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Feminism | Posted by Lana S on 11/26/2014

What Are You Teaching Your Children?

Sometimes I walk into my high school and realize that the young boys and girls who surround me will grow up and have children of their own. Just like we learn from our parents, so will our future children learn from us.

That’s when I panic.

There’s one kid in my class who particularly worries me a lot. He is sixteen years old and preaches equality because he’s a self proclaimed “punk rocker” yet still talks shit about women. What’s worse, he genuinely believes in what he says. I don’t think he is trying to be a bad person when he says he truly believes that rape is not just the attacker’s fault, but the victim’s as well. Someone – maybe his father, maybe another influential adult – taught him …

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Feminism | Posted by Arely L on 09/17/2014

Some Questions About Women and Sex

I’m sorry to say that I’ve witnessed far too many conversations in which my friends attack other girls for their sexual experiences. I have finally had enough of the way teen girls (or women of all ages, for that matter) who have sex are regarded with prejudice. There are four specific aspects of this cultural “logic” about women and sex that I particularly don’t understand.

1. Who decides what constitutes “too much” sex?

Why do people think they can determine the limits of how much sex a person can acceptably have? I don’t believe that anyone has the right to set such standards for other women or men. I enjoy my sexual freedom and don’t believe that other people’s sexual choices or ideas about sex should have any bearing on …

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