Pop-Culture | Posted by Preya P on 10/29/2014

Teen Social Media Stars and Sexism: When Will It End?

“Entertain me.”

“If you play too hard to get, then it’s just like, ‘Oh, she doesn’t even like me,’ but if you play easy, then it’s just like, ‘Oh, she’s a whore.’ Find a balance.”

“Wax, shave. It’s the worst when there’s hair.”

Wait, stop. I’m sorry but last time I checked it wasn’t the early 1900s and women don’t exist solely to appease men. And yet if comments like these in Nash Grier, Cameron Dallas, and JC Caylen’s video “What Guys Look for in Girls” is any indication, there are still young men around today who didn’t get the memo.

This video was made several months ago, but I just recently saw it and since it has received over 3 million views, I think it’s worth discussing …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Samantha M on 09/12/2014

The Problem With “Likes”

So many of my peers have an unhealthy obsession with how many “likes” their pictures (especially selfies) receive on Instagram. Many of my friends seem to give a simple “like” so much more weight than it deserves and plenty even equate the number of likes on their pictures with how attractive they are or whether or not people like them. I know teens who go so far as to delete their photo if it doesn’t receive a certain amount of likes in a given time period.

Letting social media interactions like this have so much influence on one’s life might seem ridiculous at first, but it’s evidence of something more serious. There is a lot of pressure on teen girls to feel beautiful and perfect, and for those things to …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Ines R on 08/15/2014

Stop Tweeting That and Start Living It

It is almost impossible to deny that millennials are obsessed with documenting everything. We think that something funny we see at Target, or a friend’s drunken rant at a party, or just a quick selfie must be shared with the world. Can you prove you were really within arm’s reach of Beyonce if you didn’t take a picture? It’s everywhere, from screenshots to Snapchats, one could see it as sharing joy or laughter with others. But in all sincerity, most Facebook posts or Snapchat stories are just a way to say, “Look at all the amazing and fun things I do, I am cool, and don’t you just wish you were me?”

I don’t say this in a patronizing way. Look at my camera roll and there are thousands of …

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Feminism | Posted by Sabrina N on 07/21/2014

#JusticeForJada

A few weeks ago, Jada, a 16-year-old girl from Houston, Texas, went to a house party and was given a drink by the host. Little did she know that the drink was drugged, and that she would wake up later with no memories of what had just happened.

After Jada went unconscious, she was raped. The rape was recorded via pictures and videos, which were then put on social media. When Jada woke up later she had no idea what had just happened to her. That is, until she checked social media and found alarming tweets, pictures and videos. In a horrific turn of events, her assault was then turned into a meme, where people mimicked her pose– unconscious, sprawled out on the floor, partially unclothed– and then took a …

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Feminism | Posted by aneuman on 02/3/2014

On Being Incorporated

The term incorporated is often used to describe an organization or business that has become legalized and made official. People can become incorporated as well, as in the cases of celebrities putting trademarks on their names, their public identities as part brand, part person. For better or worse (definitely worse), regular individuals are now incorporating themselves, young girls in particular. We are spending much if not all of our leisure time doing so, whether we realize it or not, and we lack the celebrity’s excuse of doing it for money.

Example: I am a girl going off to college. I meet some nice people in the first few weeks there, but nothing seems solid yet, there is no reaffirming stamp on my place in this foreign environment. I need to …

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 12/9/2013

The Problem With Mean Girls

The vast majority of us are familiar with the movie Mean Girls (written by the amazing Tina Fey). Although the film has the quintessential embellishments of most chick flicks, it also sheds light on the difficulty teenage girls face not just with their parents or boys, but with each other, even with their “best” friends. But you hardly need to watch Mean Girls to witness or experience female aggression. According to a recent New York Times Article, “The existence of female competition may seem obvious to anyone who has been in a high-school cafeteria or a singles bar, but analyzing it has been difficult because it tends be more subtle and indirect (and a lot less violent) than the male variety.” We all know that this sinister ambiance is …

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Feminism | Posted by Ruby O on 07/10/2013

Me: The Closet Feminist

I wrote before I knew women had to write under pseudonyms to get their books published.

And I rode my bike without knowing in some countries the ban on women doing so has only just been lifted.

I was a feminist before I knew of the stigma that comes with it.

I recently discovered I’d been a closet feminist my whole life. Not hiding from embarrassment or shame, but from a lack of motivation. Without the feeling I could actually change something. It hadn’t occurred to me that what I considered just to be me being overly opinionated, and a tendency to never shut my mouth, could potentially do some good. And it turned out I wasn’t the only one objecting to rape jokes, or to ‘lad’ culture, and there …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 03/15/2013

Technology and the Future of Feminism

yes, blogging is activism

Recently, I feel like I’ve been asked quite a bit about the way that technology is influencing the next generation of feminists. I have a basic answer at the ready, a couple bullet points I hit, largely based on the chapter in “A Little F’d Up” on the topic. I usually talk about my experiences here on the FBomb, how while traditional, on-the-ground activism is definitely still necessary, online activism most accurately meets young women where they already are: it is a practical answer to the reality of how we express ourselves, find information, develop our personas and spend our time and optimizes our abilities to benefit this movement. But lately, I’ve started to think about how technology specifically has shaped not only the so-called “fourth …

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