Feminism | Posted by Carolina G on 03/16/2015

If You’re Latina, Then Why Are You White?

A few weeks ago, I was at a party with a few of my friends. I had been casually using a new dating app and had been talking to a guy that seemed pretty nice. He mentioned that he happened to be out in the same area, so I told him where I was, figuring we could have a drink. He arrived with a few of his friends and I said hello. The first words out of his mouth? “False advertising. You’re not Latina.”

Sofía_Vergara_May_2014.sized

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Sofia Vergara

I wish I could say this surprised me but it really didn’t. Ever since I joined the world of online dating, my ethnicity is question

You may be thinking, “Oh, a white girl is complaining about being white.” That’s not the …

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Feminism | Posted by Ines R on 09/5/2014

On Young Women Traveling Alone

Lima, Peru: more than a stereotype

“Be careful, you’re just a girl!” I heard this phrase far too many times this summer as I prepared to leave for Brazil and Peru. Every Spring Break since I can remember I’ve traveled to Peru, and I’m unfortunately used to people’s stereotypical and prejudiced conceptions of Peruvian culture: I’m pretty sure many of my childhood friends thought that I rode llamas, wore tribal clothing and climbed mountains for the duration of my visits. But this summer, I couldn’t tell if people were skeptical because I was traveling alone as a woman, or if they were just scared of Latin America in general since they saw it as too exotic and dangerous. Regardless, because I am both a woman and Latin American it was …

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Feminism | Posted by Louisa G on 05/21/2014

Why We Need To Stop Romanticizing Mental Illness Amongst Teen Girls

I realized recently that my generation has a strange fascination with the perception of mental illness, especially as it relates to teenage girls. I’ve noticed young women posting many quotes about mental illness on their Instagrams and Tumblrs — the sadder, the better, it seems. I think this increasing fascination with and performance of depression may stem from the media through the likes of movies and books where “broken” girls are seemingly put back together by the undying love of a man. This goes further than the typical boy-meets-girl cliché of an 80s movie and delves into the fantasy that someone with severe depression can be simply “fixed” by the right guy.

The infatuation people have with making mental illness something that can be seen as beautiful and even romantic …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Eliza V on 05/19/2014

The Fault In This Star

Shailene Woodley

Shailene Woodley certainly seems to be a star on the rise. She has starred in numerous successful teen movies in the past year alone, such as The Spectacular Now, Divergent and the soon to be released and much anticipated, The Fault in Our Stars. These roles and previous interviews had led me to conclude that she’s a great advocate for the current feminist movement and a marvelous role model for younger girls. She cares about the environment, she doesn’t seem totally obsessed with her appearance and she’s a driven, successful young actress. So, I was a bit taken aback when I read an article where she clearly stated that she did not identify as a feminist.

However, what shocked me was not just that she didn’t …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 05/15/2014

What Young Women Really Need to Know About College

I went off to college my freshman year under the impression that I was headed towards the greatest experience of my life. Hastily-constructed college movies full of crappy dialogue and 30-year-old actors with perfect faces and bodies cast as 18-year-old freshmen had completely swayed my idea of what to expect, leading me to believe that instead of a liberal arts school in Manhattan, I was actually bound for some version of an orgy interspersed with classes like “The Sociological Impact of Mercantilism in Western Europe: 1600-1750″ (you know, practical, useful information that would directly impact and inform a later career). But it soon became clear that despite such unilaterally manic depictions of the college experience, it was in fact a far more complex transition, and one that was deceptively challenging …

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Creative, Feminism | Posted by Michelle C on 12/2/2013

Can You Tell Just By Looking?

 I’m a Communication Design student and for a recent Feminist & Gender Studies class, I was asked to produce a ‘Public Gender Intervention’ project: so I designed this info-graphic flowchart called,  “Can You Tell Just by Looking?”.
The main issue I wanted to address with this project is that of gender expression (the outward performance of gender), and therefore of a socially constructed idea of gender based on appearance. I also wanted to examine the non-existent relationship between gender performance and sexual orientation (who a person is sexually attracted to). With this chart, I’m attempting to intervene in the normative societal myths and preconceptions that the two are inextricably linked, and am touching on how appearance falsely influences the assumption of sexual orientation.
The flowchart directly addresses the behavior …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Angela B on 11/18/2013

The SNL Scandal

I love Kerry Washington. She is probably one of my all time favorite actresses. Her character on Scandal is smart, intelligent and well written, a rarity for black actresses today. When I found out Washington was going to be on Saturday Night Live, I was beyond stoked and couldn’t wait to see the episode when it aired on November 3rd.

The week before the episode, there was a large amount of news coverage about the lack of diversity in the SNL cast. Specifically, since the show premiered in 1975, there have been only four black female cast members.  SNL cast member Kenan Thompson told TV Guide Magazine that the reason SNL isn’t hiring black female comedians is because they “just aren’t ready and the talent pool is limited.” …

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Feminism | Posted by Bridget C. on 08/12/2013

Southern Belle or Southern Hell?

Charlotte La Bouff of "The Princess and the Frog"

Growing up, I always had the benefit of playing sports and hanging out with boys. It was great until around seventh grade. Then girls and boys separated. We didn’t play sports together during recess, PE was divided by gender, and we didn’t even sit together at lunch most days. The worst part was the teachers. Every time I dared to sit without my legs glued shut, ate quickly, or made a crude joke, I was quickly reminded to “act like a lady.” I went from a tomboy to a dainty, “ewh dirt!” exclaiming, knee-length skirt wearing teenager within a year. I hated myself for two years trying to become the lady that my community desired.

This was to be expected though. …

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