Feminism | Posted by Katie Koestner on 05/7/2014

An Open Letter to TBTN Event Holders

Katie Koestner

I was 18 years old when I joined you.  Many of you had been holding Take Back the Night events in rain or snow, amid hecklers, for years. Some of you were already making your way to radical, already past liberal.  Some of you were done with patriarchy.  Separatists.  Some of you had carried broomsticks with tampons affixed on top.  You had dyed your dormroom bedsheets black so that you could march as witches through campus. I didn’t know how much I would adore your gumption.

Some of you were not yet born.  Maybe you found TBTN when a night/day kicked you in the gut-heart-head.  You heard about us and showed up to see what this TBTN thing was, to see if you fit in.

It was the …

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Feminism | Posted by Bre K on 04/27/2012

One In Five Women

never blame yourself

There you are at three in the morning, sprawled out on someone else’s bed in a foreign room that smells like sex. Your body doesn’t even feel like yours — it feels like you’re standing over yourself, watching something happen to you. You’re not quite able to explain what’s going on. Confused. Dissembled. Disgusted. Shocked. So many feelings you can’t quite put together to equate to that word. And yet there it is: Rape. It finally pops up into your head three weeks later after you come back from Thanksgiving break — your first break during your first term in college.

No this wasn’t me. This was an 18-year-old freshmen living a couple doors down from me. Let’s say her name is Barbara.

The worst part is …

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Feminism | Posted by Emily S on 11/15/2010

Reclaiming The Night

Take Back the Night

Take Back the Night

On Thursday, November 11, 2010, I took back the night. Joined by a small group of passionate college women, I marched across my campus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to protest the perpetuation of sexual violence against women and to raise awareness regarding the rising seriousness of this issue on college campuses. Proudly walking down busy Franklin Street, we blew rape whistles, chanted verses that asserted our rights to safety at all times, and, most importantly, we walked into the night without fear. For the first time in a while, I wasn’t looking over my shoulder. I didn’t have to carry a can of pepper spray, get out my cell phone and pretend to be talking to my mom, or avoid streets …

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