Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 01/3/2011

Teens and Technology: A Feminist Issue

Facebook: the root of all evil?

Facebook: the root of all evil?

The media would like you to believe that every time you log on to Facebook or – god forbid – the evil black hole of narcissism that is Twitter, another nail is inserted into the coffin of your general ability to function as a capable, well-rounded human being. Every time you update your status, every uploaded picture taken of yourself on your macbook, every “100 Things You Didn’t Know About Me!” note you write, a modicum of self-awareness and empathy seeps from your pores. Essentially, the social networking sites that virtually our entire generation frequently uses are turning us into self-obsessed, unfeeling robots who will contribute nothing of worth to society.

Now, I don’t know that this is entirely true. But if I see …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 08/16/2010

Teen Botox Epidemic? What That Really Means.

Charice Pempengco

Charice Pempengco

After reading reports that Charice Pempengco, an 18-year-old singer who recently landed a part on Glee, got Botox treatments for her TV debut, I proceeded to bang my head against a wall–ironically achieving the same goal of altering the shape of my face through frustrated self-inflicted violence that Charice accomplished with poisonous injections.

No, in reality I am a nonviolent, non-masochistic person, so instead of head-banging I started compiling a mental list of teens I know that have had cosmetic procedures. The classic “Happy-16th-Birthday-Honey-Here’s-A-New-Nose” bit is probably the one I hear of most frequently. While I am currently unaware of any who have had Botox (despite The New York Times claim that teen Botox is becoming an epidemic, with 12,000 injections performed on Americans teens last year), I …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 07/8/2010

Circle Contact Lenses: The Terrifying Future of Beauty as We Know It

behold: circle lenses

behold: circle lenses

As Joan Jacobs, in her great book The Body Project illuminated, the idea of teen girls working to improve their bodies in a detached way – as if it were a project with perfection as its goal, rather than relating those alterations to ourselves – is not a new one. Girls have been focused on the pursuit of changing our appearances for at least a century, probably longer. At first it was “slimming,” or reducing what we ate, and wearing specific clothes (thank god the girdle is gone; I take pride in my food babies). And now we’ll do just about anything; whether it’s a diet of dexatrim max and laxatives or a $500 facial, all so that our waistlines, our skin, our [insert body part here] …

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