Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 03/22/2014

Saturday Vids: The Girls of Atomic City

I personally love uncovered stories of how women shaped history, which is why I’m adding The Girls of Atomic City to my reading list. The book covers how at the height of WWII, thousands of young girls – many in their teens – were recruited to the secret city of Oak Ridge, TN, enticed by solid wages and the promise of war-ending work.  Each girl was given a specific role and forbidden to ask about its ultimate goal or discuss with anyone else.  Kept in the dark, the girls were completely unaware what their individual roles were working together to accomplish until the atomic bomb was dropped. Denise Kiernan reveals the story behind the first Manhattan Project which began in NYC in 1942.

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Feminism | Posted by Chloe H on 06/24/2013

The Indomitable Female Fortress: Queen Elizabeth I

When I think of Elizabeth I, Queen of England from 1558 to 1603, I think of a beguiling and Machiavellian woman who, against all odds, led her country to a golden age while battling against the acute disadvantage of being a woman. Even in the United States, we have never had a female president while Elizabeth I managed to become the sole monarch of England without a husband. What I find most extraordinary is that in a time when gender inequality was widely accepted, Elizabeth I was able to control her subjects despite being a woman. To me, Elizabeth I seems to be a symbol of feminism because she became one of the most influential figures of the Western world as an entirely autonomous woman. Elizabeth I has always inspired …

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Feminism | Posted by Claire C on 05/29/2013

Margaret Thatcher: How An Anti-Feminist Inadvertently Contributed to the Cause

With the passing of Margaret Thatcher in recent months, her achievements and contributions have been much analyzed. Thatcher has been described as “the most influential politician of her generation” and a “key political figure of the twentieth century.” One area of Thatcher’s life which has been examined is her contribution to the feminist cause. This is something that cannot be overlooked, especially as Thatcher was the first (and to this day, only) female Prime Minster of the U.K. Political pundits cannot help but describe Margaret Thatcher in regards to her sex, with terms such as “Lady Thatcher” and “the Iron Lady.”

It is generally believed that Thatcher did next to nothing in the fight to further women’s rights in the U.K. For instance, there was only one other woman in …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 11/28/2011

Reading Women Writers

Like many other college freshmen across the country, I enrolled in a prerequisite, required English class for my first semester of school. Unlike most other college freshmen, though, I wasn’t stuck reading the immortal words of old, dead White dudes. Instead, I enrolled in a course called “Women and Culture” which was, predictably, all about female writers and female-centric works.

Yeah, I know – a feminist blogger at a women’s college enrolled in “Women and Culture.” I am a walking, talking feminist stereotype. But in actuality, my thought process behind choosing that course over courses that focused on the literature of South America or the Mediterranean (my other choices) wasn’t exactly rooted in my feminist identity (at least not at face value). It was more that when I really thought …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 03/3/2011

Mary Cassatt: Where Are The Female Artists?

This semester in school I’m taking an Art History class. Full disclosure: I actually did not choose to be in this class, but because of scheduling conflicts was funneled in. In fact, I’m artistically challenged.

This has always been a point of contention for me. I love the arts. I’ve been surrounded by art, music and theatre my entire life – in fact, my Grandmother and Mom are both visual artists and my Dad and Brother are both in the theatre industry. And yet I’m thoroughly untalented. I pick up a paintbrush and I swear the paper tries to escape from my manic clutches.

Therefore, I was incredibly trepidatious in this class (which really is more art than history) until our major project of the semester was assigned. We were …

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Feminism | Posted by Julie Z on 04/15/2010

Male Studies (As Opposed to Women’s Studies)

On Monday, the New York Times reported about the creation of a “Male Studies” program at Wagner College in Staten Island.

Christina Hoff Sommers, a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and author of The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism Is Harming Our Young Mendecided to throw in her two cents (and really, that’s what it’s worth) saying, “I am concerned that it’s widespread in the United States that masculinity is politically incorrect.”

Dr. Lionel Tiger, a professor of anthropology at Rutgers, and supporter of Male Studies, identifies feminism as the root of all evil, calling it, “a well-meaning, highly successful, very colorful denigration of maleness as a force, as a phenomenon.”

Wow. Where to start? Well, first of all, the last time I checked, …

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