Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 06/23/2013

Support Women Artists Sunday: Elliphant

Elliphant

Sounding like the twisted illegitimate offspring of MIA and Diplo – as deliciously fierce as the former but as intelligently playful as the latter – Elliphant pulls the balls of this dancehall slayer through its own throat and ties them in a cherry knot the other side.

Ellinor Olovsdotter slowly morphed into Elliphant through the course of a long (and lost) summer travelling in the UK with only a dubstep soundsystem for company. After falling in love with the urban music sounds of London she returned home to Stockholm, on Sweden’s East Coast, boasting sizzling MC skills and some serious lyrical prowess.

Now, having already won over the likes of Dazed & Confused ["all abstract lyrcisms and cheap dirty beats"], NME “[amazing'"], Pitchfork “[Elliphant sound like nothing but the

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Emma E on 08/24/2011

Reversing Gender Roles With A Little Help From Ke$ha

Could Ke$ha possibly be helping feminism?

Could Ke$ha possibly be helping feminism?

When most people think of Ke$ha, feminism is not the first word that comes to mind. But I think her music does have some vaguely feminist merits.

I remember some time before I even discovered the FBomb (my life must have been so meaningless…) I was thinking about sexism in music. I remember thinking, “I wonder why most music by women is all about how much they love their guys, and men’s music is all about hooking up with random, personality-less girls at parties? Women almost never treat men like meaningless objects in music, but men do all the time.”

I tried to think of a song where women treat men like men treat them. The only one I could come up with was …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 08/21/2011

Support Women Artists Sunday: Haley Bonar

Haley Bonar

Haley Bonar

Haley Bonar (born 1983, Brandon, Manitoba) is an American alternative country singer-songwriter who hails from South Dakota. She has lived in Duluth and St. Paul, Minnesota. In July 2009, she moved to Portland, Oregon, where she currently resides. She plays guitar and keyboards and typically is backed sparingly, in some instances by only a drummer.

In 2003 Bonar’s album . . . The Size of Planets (Chairkicker’s Union) received favorable reviews in the Minneapolis press. The album spawned the single “Am I Allowed,” which was played on college radio stations.

In 2006 she released the album Lure the Fox,’, originally on Mary Ellen Recordings, whose owner, Mary Lewis, decided to help Bonar pay to record the album at Pachyderm Studio after reading a Star Tribune article about her

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 05/21/2011

Saturday Vids: Out of the Vinyl Deeps – Ellen Willis on Rock Music

Ellen Willis

Ellen Willis

In 1968, the New Yorker hired Ellen Willis as its first popular music critic. Her column, Rock, Etc., ran for seven years and established Willis as a leader in cultural commentary and a pioneer in the nascent and otherwise male-dominated field of rock criticism. As a writer for a magazine with a circulation of nearly half a million, Willis was also the country’s most widely read rock critic. With a voice at once sharp, thoughtful, and ecstatic, she covered a wide range of artists—Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin, the Rolling Stones, Creedence Clearwater Revival, and the Velvet Underground,—assessing their albums and performances not only on their originality, musicianship, and cultural impact but also in terms of how they made her feel.

Because Willis stopped writing about music in the …

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