Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 01/1/2012

Support Women Artists Sunday: Vera Chytilová

Vera Chytilová was born on February 2, 1929, in Ostrava, Czechoslovakia (now Czech Republic). She studied philosophy and architecture in Brno for two years, then worked as a technical draftsman, a designer, a fashion model, a photo re-toucher, then worked as a clapper girl for Barrandov Film Studios in Prague. There she continued as a writer, actress, and assistant director.

She was denied a scholarship, or even a recommendation from Barrandov, but she took the admissions tests at FAMU and was accepted. From 1957-1962 she studied film directing under Otakar Vávra, who also taught Jirí Menzel, Milos Forman, Jan Nemec, and Ivan Passer. In 1962 she graduated as director from Film Academy (FAMU) in Prague. Her graduation film ‘Strop’ (Ceiling 1962) and the following film ‘Pytel blech’ (A Bagful of …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 12/4/2011

Support Women Artists Sunday: Agnés Varda

Agnès Varda (born 30 May 1928) is a French film director and professor at the European Graduate School. Her movies, photographs, and art installations focus on documentary realism, feminist issues, and social commentary — with a distinct experimental style.

Varda was born Arlette Varda in Brussels, Belgium, the daughter of Christiane (née Pasquet) and Eugene Jean Varda, an engineer. Her mother was French and her father’s family were Greek refugees from Asia Minor.

Varda studied Art History at the Ecole du Louvre before getting a job as the official photographer for the Théâtre National Populaire in Paris. She liked photography but was interested in moving into film. After spending a few days filming the small French fishing town of La Pointe Courte for a terminally ill friend who could no …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Emma E on 08/10/2011

Why I Won’t Be Seeing 30 Minutes Or Less

A few weeks ago, I went to see the movie Bad Teacher (not my choice, okay?). A preview for the movie 30 Minutes or Less came on. The movie is about a guy who gets a bomb strapped to his chest by guys in gorilla suits and is forced to rob a bank. It stars Jesse Eisenberg, AKA The Guy Who Played The Guy Who Created Facebook. I was putting the movie into my “Not exactly a must-see, but if someone else was insistent on seeing it with me, it wouldn’t be the end of the world” category, when I was hit with a joke that was distinctly unfunny.

The two main characters were at the supermarket, buying some supplies for their bank robbery, which include masks, duct tape, etc. …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 04/30/2011

Saturday Vids: Ideal Women

Elena Rossini is a film director, cinematographer and editor from Italy. She’s also a really awesome woman who is working on multiple feminist projects, including a documentary about the manipulation of women’s bodies in our culture (The Illusionists) and an awesome blog (No Country for Young Women) that works to connect women across generations (that I happen to have been featured on). One of my favorite works of Elena’s, however, is her short film “Ideal Women” which was commissioned by ARTE/the Louvre Museum’s project “4 Semaines” and which I was lucky enough to see at the Endangered Species Summit. Enjoy!

Ideal Women from Elena Rossini on Vimeo.

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 06/6/2010

Support Women Artists Sunday: Helena Bonham Carter

Helena Bonham Carter, daughter of Raymond Bonham Carter, a merchant banker, and Elena Bonham Carter (née Propper de Callejón), a psychotherapist, was born in Golders Green, London, England on May 26, 1966 and is the youngest of three children. She is the great-granddaughter of former Prime Minister Herbert H. Asquith and her blue-blooded family tree also contains Barons and Baronesses, diplomats, and a director.

After experiencing family dramas that included her father’s stroke-which left him wheelchair-bound-and attending South Hampstead High School and Westminster School in London, Bonham Carter devoted herself to an acting career. That trajectory actually began in 1979 when, at age 13, she entered a national poetry writing competition and used her second place winnings to place her photo in the casting directory “Spotlight.” She soon had her

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 05/26/2010

All The Way

Therese Shechter, the awesome documentarian who brought us I Was A Teenage Feminist, is it again, and this time she’s tackling virginity with “How to Lose Your Virginity“:

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 04/25/2010

Support Women Artists Sunday: Ellen Page

A lot of people may criticize Juno, saying that it’s an unrealistic portrayal of teen pregnancy (and these are valid claims) – but it’s hard to deny how awesome Ellen Page was in that movie. She’s funny, clearly smart and a very talented actress and she definitely deserves some FBomb love.

Born Ellen Philpotts-Page on February 21, 1987 in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The daughter of a teacher and a graphic designer, Ellen Page took an interest in theater from a young age. She performed in her first local production in the fifth grade and won Canada’s prestigious Gemini nomination for her role in the made-for-TV movie Pit Pony in 1997. The busy actress went on to appear in several Canadian television series, including the Pit Pony spin-off, Trailer Park

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