Pop-Culture | Posted by Alice W on 05/27/2014

Why Sansa Stark Doesn’t Owe You Anything

I’m hesitant to trust people who call Game of Thrones’ Sansa Stark whiney, basic, boring and weak. How someone feels about Sansa Stark tells me a lot about how they think about women.

Sansa Stark is the eldest daughter of the once powerful House Stark. She’s watched her own father be beheaded, had her fiancee point a loaded crossbow at her while knights ripped off her clothes — all in the first season. Since then she has been forced to marry into the family who had her mother and brother killed. And many fans of the show hate her.

Sure, she is not the most sassy or kickass woman in Westeros, where Game of Thrones takes place. Daenerys is badass, beautiful, taking what is hers with fire and blood. …

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Feminism | Posted by Paulina P on 05/23/2014

Don’t Blame Girls for Their Own Sexualization

I was over the moon when I was able to attend to the Women in the World Summit this year, thanks to my best friend generously giving me her ticket. It was was awe-inspiring and powerful day. I felt like I was watching history being made while sitting in Lincoln Center with so many women who had and are making history. The entire day was constructed in a way that highlighted so many accomplishments, and I felt like I could achieve anything; I was ready to leave that conference and change the world. But this all came to a screeching halt when the discussion turned to the sexualization of women in the media.

Here are a couple quotes from the panel that sent my head spinning:

“I don’t understand why …

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Feminism | Posted by Louisa G on 05/21/2014

Why We Need To Stop Romanticizing Mental Illness Amongst Teen Girls

I realized recently that my generation has a strange fascination with the perception of mental illness, especially as it relates to teenage girls. I’ve noticed young women posting many quotes about mental illness on their Instagrams and Tumblrs — the sadder, the better, it seems. I think this increasing fascination with and performance of depression may stem from the media through the likes of movies and books where “broken” girls are seemingly put back together by the undying love of a man. This goes further than the typical boy-meets-girl cliché of an 80s movie and delves into the fantasy that someone with severe depression can be simply “fixed” by the right guy.

The infatuation people have with making mental illness something that can be seen as beautiful and even romantic …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Eliza V on 05/19/2014

The Fault In This Star

Shailene Woodley certainly seems to be a star on the rise. She has starred in numerous successful teen movies in the past year alone, such as The Spectacular Now, Divergent and the soon to be released and much anticipated, The Fault in Our Stars. These roles and previous interviews had led me to conclude that she’s a great advocate for the current feminist movement and a marvelous role model for younger girls. She cares about the environment, she doesn’t seem totally obsessed with her appearance and she’s a driven, successful young actress. So, I was a bit taken aback when I read an article where she clearly stated that she did not identify as a feminist.

However, what shocked me was not just that she didn’t adopt the …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Annemarie McDaniel on 05/5/2014

America Voted for Laverne Cox, So Why Didn’t TIME Magazine Listen?

When I was in 12th grade, I asked my parents to buy me a subscription to TIME Magazine so I could learn more about current events before heading off to college. I still remember when the TIME 100 Most Influential came in the mail, and the glossy collage of famous faces on its cover.  I read every single bio inside, thinking to myself how I wanted to know the stories of such important and inspiring people. Two years later, TIME 100 has tried more and more to capture the attention of young audiences through social media. TIME’s online poll allowed users to vote for their favorites and then share their votes on Facebook or Twitter. Friends of mine who weren’t regular TIME readers were still tweeting and posting about …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Joneka P on 03/17/2014

Black Women Create: Highlighting Black Women in Film and TV

Many people underestimate the power that representation in the media can have for young girls, and especially young girls of color–but connecting with the experiences of another person and empathizing with their stories and lives is powerful.  Whenever we talk about why representation matters, I always think about this quote from actress Whoopi Goldberg:

“When I was nine years old Star Trek came on. I looked at it and I went screaming through the house, ‘Come here, mum, everybody, come quick, come quick, there’s a black lady on television and she ain’t no maid!’ I knew right then and there I could be anything I wanted to be.”

Now, though, television seems overwhelmingly white. It wasn’t always this way. I grew up watching shows like Good Times, A Different …

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Feminism, Pop-Culture | Posted by Amanda C on 02/26/2014

Vogue vs Dunham vs Jezebel

Recently, I have been caught up in thinking about Lena Dunham’s photo-shoot for Vogue Magazine.  I am an avid Girls watcher and a Lena Dunham fan: she’s quirky, funny, sharp, and not afraid to say what she believes.  So, of course, I was thrilled to see her on the cover of Vogue, a media source that would be far more likely to photograph the Giseles of the world than the Lenas.  But a controversy began to surround the photo – a controversy not instigated by those who wanted to take a quirky intellectual like Lena off the cover, but by Jezebel, a website which considers themselves to have a feminist aim.

Jezebel quickly responded to the photos of Dunham with skepticism about the images, offered to pay $10,000 for the …

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Pop-Culture | Posted by Julie Z on 02/22/2014

Saturday Vids: Elsa Teaches Disney Princesses About Empowerment

Though there has been some debate about whether or not Frozen is feminist or not, I personally feel that I can get behind this musical parody’s message: why be confined to hiding behind true love?

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